lizziec: (potterpuffs - Fred and George)
I've been loving Mark Does Stuff for a long time. I've been reading his stuff ever since he read The Twilight Saga which was amazing from a watching someone disintegrate in front of your very eyes point of view. Then he did Harry Potter, which was brilliant from a he's never read this before and thinks it's fucking awesome point of view.

Then he started to watch stuff as well and of the things I watch he's done Doctor Who and Sherlock.

Seriously, if you can find time to read those reviews they're brilliant, because it's incredibly exciting to see someone discovering something you love for the first time.

And now he's started watching Battlestar Galactica which is so exciting for me to read.

Anyway, this is me recommending that you read this stuff, that you add his sites to your RSS reader and that you sit back and enjoy someone discovering Battlestar Galactica for the first time. I'm loving it.

Random graphic about Hera Agathon. Well it amused me )

This entry was originally posted at http://lizziec.dreamwidth.org/423884.html. There are currently comments on the original entry.
lizziec: (potterpuffs - Neville and Trevor)
Ben and I spent part of our afternoon doing this:

Harry Potter 7 ticket

My (brief) thoughts below. Spoilers will (probably) abound, so if you don't want to risk it then don't read on...

Spoilers! )

Finally, Ben is a great husband because he noticed when I started crying and gave me a tissue :) It was even clean! ;)

This entry was originally posted at http://lizziec.dreamwidth.org/422431.html. There are currently comments on the original entry.
lizziec: (toys - Giraffe)
We went on holiday to Norfolk this year, to this beautiful cottage called "Remus" in Larling, through this brilliant company who let holiday cottages in five locales, despite being called "Best of Suffolk" ;)

I was pretty excited about going, but didn't realise how much I really needed to get away from everything after the year we've had so far. And I really did need to get away, and feel miles better for having done so.

Day One - Friday 3rd September - Travelling and settling in )

Day Two - Saturday 4th September - Relaxing in the cottage )

Day Three - Sunday 5th September - Bure Valley Railway and Great Yarmouth )

Day Four - Monday 6th September - Banham Zoo (featuring Giraffes) )

Day Five - Tuesday 7th September - The world's most disappointing Toy and Model Expo and England's only Whisky distillery )

Day Six - Wednesday 8th September - IWM Duxford )

Day Seven - Thursday 9th September - Norwich )

Day Eight - Friday 10th September - Home again (with a stop at Bluewater en-route) )

It was really good to be away, but it was quite nice to get home again.

The fantastic news, and a good way to round off our holiday, is this was our last holiday in which I had to do all the driving, because on Monday, Ben passed his driving test first time \o/ (though this does mean I now have to share the car ;))

This entry was originally posted at http://lizziec.dreamwidth.org/414937.html. There are currently comment count unavailable comments on the original entry.
lizziec: (toys - Giraffe)
We went on holiday to Norfolk this year, to this beautiful cottage called "Remus" in Larling, through this brilliant company who let holiday cottages in five locales, despite being called "Best of Suffolk" ;)

I was pretty excited about going, but didn't realise how much I really needed to get away from everything after the year we've had so far. And I really did need to get away, and feel miles better for having done so.

Day One - Friday 3rd September - Travelling and settling in )

Day Two - Saturday 4th September - Relaxing in the cottage )

Day Three - Sunday 5th September - Bure Valley Railway and Great Yarmouth )

Day Four - Monday 6th September - Banham Zoo (featuring Giraffes) )

Day Five - Tuesday 7th September - The world's most disappointing Toy and Model Expo and England's only Whisky distillery )

Day Six - Wednesday 8th September - IWM Duxford )

Day Seven - Thursday 9th September - Norwich )

Day Eight - Friday 10th September - Home again (with a stop at Bluewater en-route) )

It was really good to be away, but it was quite nice to get home again.

The fantastic news, and a good way to round off our holiday, is this was our last holiday in which I had to do all the driving, because on Monday, Ben passed his driving test first time \o/ (though this does mean I now have to share the car ;))

This entry was originally posted at http://lizziec.dreamwidth.org/414937.html. There are currently comment count unavailable comments on the original entry.
lizziec: (Granny's garden bee)
We went on holiday to Norfolk this year, to this beautiful cottage called "Remus" in Larling, through this brilliant company who let holiday cottages in five locales, despite being called "Best of Suffolk" ;)

I was pretty excited about going, but didn't realise how much I really needed to get away from everything after the year we've had so far. And I really did need to get away, and feel miles better for having done so.

Day One - Friday 3rd September - Travelling and settling in )

Day Two - Saturday 4th September - Relaxing in the cottage )

Day Three - Sunday 5th September - Bure Valley Railway and Great Yarmouth )

Day Four - Monday 6th September - Banham Zoo (featuring Giraffes) )

Day Five - Tuesday 7th September - The world's most disappointing Toy and Model Expo and England's only Whisky distillery )

Day Six - Wednesday 8th September - IWM Duxford )

Day Seven - Thursday 9th September - Norwich )

Day Eight - Friday 10th September - Home again (with a stop at Bluewater en-route) )

It was really good to be away, but it was quite nice to get home again.

The fantastic news, and a good way to round off our holiday, is this was our last holiday in which I had to do all the driving, because on Monday, Ben passed his driving test first time \o/ (though this does mean I now have to share the car ;))
lizziec: (toys - max at work)
My new laptop (Thinkpad SL500) arrived on Wednesday, which was extremely exciting for me. As always, I got a lot of pictures :) Now I've finished setting it up and moving files around I finally got around to getting the pictures off my camera and posting them here to show off :)


My old laptop (Thinkpad R50e) was old...


...and pretty busted :/ (Yes, that is micropore holding a corner on.)


When I got back from picking it up there was some post for me :)


It was my new copy of Ramona Forever! :D

I'm not quite sure how I managed it, but I was patient enough to take pictures of the unwrappening:



The lid is shiny, but fingerprints silly easily.


Old vs New (click to embiggen).

All pictures.

The new one runs like a dream, even with Vista installed. I think I'm in love (sorry [livejournal.com profile] benc).

I'm still trying to decide what to do with my old one, which is staying with me for a few weeks at least so I'm sure I have everything I need from it and I'm completely happy with my new one. Any ideas? Any people maybe interested in taking it?
lizziec: (toys - max at work)
My new laptop (Thinkpad SL500) arrived on Wednesday, which was extremely exciting for me. As always, I got a lot of pictures :) Now I've finished setting it up and moving files around I finally got around to getting the pictures off my camera and posting them here to show off :)


My old laptop (Thinkpad R50e) was old...


...and pretty busted :/ (Yes, that is micropore holding a corner on.)


When I got back from picking it up there was some post for me :)


It was my new copy of Ramona Forever! :D

I'm not quite sure how I managed it, but I was patient enough to take pictures of the unwrappening:



The lid is shiny, but fingerprints silly easily.


Old vs New (click to embiggen).

All pictures.

The new one runs like a dream, even with Vista installed. I think I'm in love (sorry [livejournal.com profile] benc).

I'm still trying to decide what to do with my old one, which is staying with me for a few weeks at least so I'm sure I have everything I need from it and I'm completely happy with my new one. Any ideas? Any people maybe interested in taking it?
lizziec: (toys - max at work)
My new laptop (Thinkpad SL500) arrived on Wednesday, which was extremely exciting for me. As always, I got a lot of pictures :) Now I've finished setting it up and moving files around I finally got around to getting the pictures off my camera and posting them here to show off :)


My old laptop (Thinkpad R50e) was old...


...and pretty busted :/ (Yes, that is micropore holding a corner on.)


When I got back from picking it up there was some post for me :)


It was my new copy of Ramona Forever! :D

I'm not quite sure how I managed it, but I was patient enough to take pictures of the unwrappening:



The lid is shiny, but fingerprints silly easily.


Old vs New (click to embiggen).

All pictures.

The new one runs like a dream, even with Vista installed. I think I'm in love (sorry [livejournal.com profile] benc).

I'm still trying to decide what to do with my old one, which is staying with me for a few weeks at least so I'm sure I have everything I need from it and I'm completely happy with my new one. Any ideas? Any people maybe interested in taking it?
lizziec: (apod - lightening-moon)
I've recently been reading my brand new copy of When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit (my old one, that I had had since I was 8 or so, fell apart from being read rather a lot). I got my new copy through the [livejournal.com profile] lj_uk Christmas Wishlist exchange - it's this edition (2008). According to Barnes and Noble (and various other sites) this book is recommended for 8-12 year olds. I'd agree with that, seems like a good age to read it for the first time.

My edition has a foreword called "Why You'll Love This Book" by Michael Morpurgo, Children's Laureate from 2003-2005. Bear in mind, when reading what comes next that this book is recommended for ages 8-12. His style in writing the foreword suggests that he is talking to these young readers.

The fifth paragraph starts:
"When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, published forty years ago, speaks to us of a time most of us know only through books of history and fiction, through archive film, as well as through movies. It is from The Diary of Anne Frank to I am David and Schindler's List and The Pianist that most of us have our haunting but distant insights into the lives of those who had experienced the terrors and horrors of Nazi persecution and extermination..."

I understand that 8-12 year olds may well have read the former two (The Diary of Anne Frank and I am David) - I know I had read at least one of those at that age (Anne Frank), having both a taste for the historical and something of a fascination with all things WWII (and Holocaust - I think I was a rather odd child). However, I highly doubt they have seen the latter (Schindler's List and The Pianist), not least because they're both rated 15. Don't get me wrong, they're both right up there as favourite films, I think they're amazing. But they're definitely not for children of the age the book is primarily aimed at.

I dunno. That part of the foreword just felt rather odd. Surely, given the writer's status as a former Children's Laureate, he would be aware of what a child of that age has been exposed to, and what they haven't?

lizziec: (apod - lightening-moon)
I've recently been reading my brand new copy of When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit (my old one, that I had had since I was 8 or so, fell apart from being read rather a lot). I got my new copy through the [livejournal.com profile] lj_uk Christmas Wishlist exchange - it's this edition (2008). According to Barnes and Noble (and various other sites) this book is recommended for 8-12 year olds. I'd agree with that, seems like a good age to read it for the first time.

My edition has a foreword called "Why You'll Love This Book" by Michael Morpurgo, Children's Laureate from 2003-2005. Bear in mind, when reading what comes next that this book is recommended for ages 8-12. His style in writing the foreword suggests that he is talking to these young readers.

The fifth paragraph starts:
"When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, published forty years ago, speaks to us of a time most of us know only through books of history and fiction, through archive film, as well as through movies. It is from The Diary of Anne Frank to I am David and Schindler's List and The Pianist that most of us have our haunting but distant insights into the lives of those who had experienced the terrors and horrors of Nazi persecution and extermination..."

I understand that 8-12 year olds may well have read the former two (The Diary of Anne Frank and I am David) - I know I had read at least one of those at that age (Anne Frank), having both a taste for the historical and something of a fascination with all things WWII (and Holocaust - I think I was a rather odd child). However, I highly doubt they have seen the latter (Schindler's List and The Pianist), not least because they're both rated 15. Don't get me wrong, they're both right up there as favourite films, I think they're amazing. But they're definitely not for children of the age the book is primarily aimed at.

I dunno. That part of the foreword just felt rather odd. Surely, given the writer's status as a former Children's Laureate, he would be aware of what a child of that age has been exposed to, and what they haven't?

lizziec: (apod - lightening-moon)
I've recently been reading my brand new copy of When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit (my old one, that I had had since I was 8 or so, fell apart from being read rather a lot). I got my new copy through the [livejournal.com profile] lj_uk Christmas Wishlist exchange - it's this edition (2008). According to Barnes and Noble (and various other sites) this book is recommended for 8-12 year olds. I'd agree with that, seems like a good age to read it for the first time.

My edition has a foreword called "Why You'll Love This Book" by Michael Morpurgo, Children's Laureate from 2003-2005. Bear in mind, when reading what comes next that this book is recommended for ages 8-12. His style in writing the foreword suggests that he is talking to these young readers.

The fifth paragraph starts:
"When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, published forty years ago, speaks to us of a time most of us know only through books of history and fiction, through archive film, as well as through movies. It is from The Diary of Anne Frank to I am David and Schindler's List and The Pianist that most of us have our haunting but distant insights into the lives of those who had experienced the terrors and horrors of Nazi persecution and extermination..."

I understand that 8-12 year olds may well have read the former two (The Diary of Anne Frank and I am David) - I know I had read at least one of those at that age (Anne Frank), having both a taste for the historical and something of a fascination with all things WWII (and Holocaust - I think I was a rather odd child). However, I highly doubt they have seen the latter (Schindler's List and The Pianist), not least because they're both rated 15. Don't get me wrong, they're both right up there as favourite films, I think they're amazing. But they're definitely not for children of the age the book is primarily aimed at.

I dunno. That part of the foreword just felt rather odd. Surely, given the writer's status as a former Children's Laureate, he would be aware of what a child of that age has been exposed to, and what they haven't?
lizziec: (acid)
Recently I've been reading The Berlin Wall: 13 August 1961 - 9 November 1989 by Frederick Taylor (which, by the way, is an excellent book that I am highly recommending), and a couple of paragraphs jumped out at me as being completely and utterly appropriate to describe Gordon Brown and everything that is happening at the moment. As George Santayana apparently once said "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it". Perhaps Gordon Brown should pay closer attention to the lessons History has for us :)

"In the September 1965 elections, the SPD made further gains. Brandt again failed to achieve victory, but the Social Democrats' share of the vote continued to edge upwards. The conservatives' share continued its decline, while the liberal Free Democrats lost quite heavily. But the conservative/liberal coalition, led by Adenauer's successor, Ludwig Erhard, hung on to power.

As Economics Minister, Professor Erhard had been the architecht of the West German 'economic miracle' after 1949, but, like so many long-serving successful second-in-commands, once he finally heaved himself into the top position he swiftly confirmed why he had always been the deputy and not the chief. Erhard proved inept at both party-politicking and foreign policy. Moreover, for the first time since the end of the war, German industry went into recession and a 'black hole' appeared in the state finances.
With half a million West Germans unemployed - paradisiacal, at just over 2 per cent of the work-force, as this may seem by twenty-first-century standards - in 1966 there was anxious talk of a return to the 1930s." (Pages 512-513)

See what I mean? ;) If you changed some words (Erhard for Brown, West German for Britain etc) it could have been written about our Iron Chancellor Prime Minister.

ETA: I just realised I don't have a history icon! :O This will have to be rectified!
lizziec: (acid)
Recently I've been reading The Berlin Wall: 13 August 1961 - 9 November 1989 by Frederick Taylor (which, by the way, is an excellent book that I am highly recommending), and a couple of paragraphs jumped out at me as being completely and utterly appropriate to describe Gordon Brown and everything that is happening at the moment. As George Santayana apparently once said "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it". Perhaps Gordon Brown should pay closer attention to the lessons History has for us :)

"In the September 1965 elections, the SPD made further gains. Brandt again failed to achieve victory, but the Social Democrats' share of the vote continued to edge upwards. The conservatives' share continued its decline, while the liberal Free Democrats lost quite heavily. But the conservative/liberal coalition, led by Adenauer's successor, Ludwig Erhard, hung on to power.

As Economics Minister, Professor Erhard had been the architecht of the West German 'economic miracle' after 1949, but, like so many long-serving successful second-in-commands, once he finally heaved himself into the top position he swiftly confirmed why he had always been the deputy and not the chief. Erhard proved inept at both party-politicking and foreign policy. Moreover, for the first time since the end of the war, German industry went into recession and a 'black hole' appeared in the state finances.
With half a million West Germans unemployed - paradisiacal, at just over 2 per cent of the work-force, as this may seem by twenty-first-century standards - in 1966 there was anxious talk of a return to the 1930s." (Pages 512-513)

See what I mean? ;) If you changed some words (Erhard for Brown, West German for Britain etc) it could have been written about our Iron Chancellor Prime Minister.

ETA: I just realised I don't have a history icon! :O This will have to be rectified!
lizziec: (acid)
Recently I've been reading The Berlin Wall: 13 August 1961 - 9 November 1989 by Frederick Taylor (which, by the way, is an excellent book that I am highly recommending), and a couple of paragraphs jumped out at me as being completely and utterly appropriate to describe Gordon Brown and everything that is happening at the moment. As George Santayana apparently once said "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it". Perhaps Gordon Brown should pay closer attention to the lessons History has for us :)

"In the September 1965 elections, the SPD made further gains. Brandt again failed to achieve victory, but the Social Democrats' share of the vote continued to edge upwards. The conservatives' share continued its decline, while the liberal Free Democrats lost quite heavily. But the conservative/liberal coalition, led by Adenauer's successor, Ludwig Erhard, hung on to power.

As Economics Minister, Professor Erhard had been the architecht of the West German 'economic miracle' after 1949, but, like so many long-serving successful second-in-commands, once he finally heaved himself into the top position he swiftly confirmed why he had always been the deputy and not the chief. Erhard proved inept at both party-politicking and foreign policy. Moreover, for the first time since the end of the war, German industry went into recession and a 'black hole' appeared in the state finances.
With half a million West Germans unemployed - paradisiacal, at just over 2 per cent of the work-force, as this may seem by twenty-first-century standards - in 1966 there was anxious talk of a return to the 1930s." (Pages 512-513)

See what I mean? ;) If you changed some words (Erhard for Brown, West German for Britain etc) it could have been written about our Iron Chancellor Prime Minister.

ETA: I just realised I don't have a history icon! :O This will have to be rectified!
lizziec: (Rocks fall)
I finally got round to photographing and uploading more pictures from "From Vision to Reality", as well as rephotographing those that were already there so they are better quality. They are here for those who want to look :) I've also made a new LJ icon.

ION: I went to see The Dark Knight this evening at Ashford. Twas good. Won't say any more though in case of spoilers.

lizziec: (Rocks fall)
I finally got round to photographing and uploading more pictures from "From Vision to Reality", as well as rephotographing those that were already there so they are better quality. They are here for those who want to look :) I've also made a new LJ icon.

ION: I went to see The Dark Knight this evening at Ashford. Twas good. Won't say any more though in case of spoilers.

lizziec: (Rocks fall)
I finally got round to photographing and uploading more pictures from "From Vision to Reality", as well as rephotographing those that were already there so they are better quality. They are here for those who want to look :) I've also made a new LJ icon.

ION: I went to see The Dark Knight this evening at Ashford. Twas good. Won't say any more though in case of spoilers.
lizziec: (LDS- Young women)
Wives and Sisters had been sitting around on our bookcase waiting for me to get around to reading it after [livejournal.com profile] no1typo recommended it to me. I reorganised our bookcases the other day, which was no mean feat, and in the process I found this book again.

The story is one of a girl who grew up mormon, went through various traumatic experiences which she was not supported through, and started to try and find her way out of the church and begin to heal herself. The response of the male characters of the church in response to any queries she makes about the experiences she has undergone is to pray and to get over them because they are in the past. Honestly it would be funny if it wasn't so tragic and true to life.

The book itself is full of suspense, as the main character, Allison, begins her journey out of Mormonism she also begins her journey to find the people responsible for the traumatic incidences in her childhood.

The author, Natalie R. Collins, is an ex-mormon herself. I was pleasantly surprised by her writing and the way mormonism features in her book. I possibly appreciated it more than others because I recognised so many of the incidences as being part of my own childhood, for example, the excerpt below about prayer. I found that particular passage very funny, I think largely because I recognised the situation as one I had been in so many times (not the actual outing, but the the praying morning, noon and night, the words used and the trying to make prayers different so they would stand out.)

Excerpt )

I would really recommend this book to people wanting to find out more about mormonism while also reading what is essentially a crime novel. The author is very good at inserting details of Mormon beliefs and cultural life into the narrative without interrupting the flow of the novel. I would really like to read more by her.

CBB Book a Week challenge 2008
1/52, Stasiland by Anna Funder
2/52, The Nazis, A Warning from History by Laurence Rees
3/52, A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett
lizziec: (LDS- Young women)
Wives and Sisters had been sitting around on our bookcase waiting for me to get around to reading it after [livejournal.com profile] no1typo recommended it to me. I reorganised our bookcases the other day, which was no mean feat, and in the process I found this book again.

The story is one of a girl who grew up mormon, went through various traumatic experiences which she was not supported through, and started to try and find her way out of the church and begin to heal herself. The response of the male characters of the church in response to any queries she makes about the experiences she has undergone is to pray and to get over them because they are in the past. Honestly it would be funny if it wasn't so tragic and true to life.

The book itself is full of suspense, as the main character, Allison, begins her journey out of Mormonism she also begins her journey to find the people responsible for the traumatic incidences in her childhood.

The author, Natalie R. Collins, is an ex-mormon herself. I was pleasantly surprised by her writing and the way mormonism features in her book. I possibly appreciated it more than others because I recognised so many of the incidences as being part of my own childhood, for example, the excerpt below about prayer. I found that particular passage very funny, I think largely because I recognised the situation as one I had been in so many times (not the actual outing, but the the praying morning, noon and night, the words used and the trying to make prayers different so they would stand out.)

Excerpt )

I would really recommend this book to people wanting to find out more about mormonism while also reading what is essentially a crime novel. The author is very good at inserting details of Mormon beliefs and cultural life into the narrative without interrupting the flow of the novel. I would really like to read more by her.

CBB Book a Week challenge 2008
1/52, Stasiland by Anna Funder
2/52, The Nazis, A Warning from History by Laurence Rees
3/52, A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett
lizziec: (LDS- Young women)
Wives and Sisters had been sitting around on our bookcase waiting for me to get around to reading it after [livejournal.com profile] no1typo recommended it to me. I reorganised our bookcases the other day, which was no mean feat, and in the process I found this book again.

The story is one of a girl who grew up mormon, went through various traumatic experiences which she was not supported through, and started to try and find her way out of the church and begin to heal herself. The response of the male characters of the church in response to any queries she makes about the experiences she has undergone is to pray and to get over them because they are in the past. Honestly it would be funny if it wasn't so tragic and true to life.

The book itself is full of suspense, as the main character, Allison, begins her journey out of Mormonism she also begins her journey to find the people responsible for the traumatic incidences in her childhood.

The author, Natalie R. Collins, is an ex-mormon herself. I was pleasantly surprised by her writing and the way mormonism features in her book. I possibly appreciated it more than others because I recognised so many of the incidences as being part of my own childhood, for example, the excerpt below about prayer. I found that particular passage very funny, I think largely because I recognised the situation as one I had been in so many times (not the actual outing, but the the praying morning, noon and night, the words used and the trying to make prayers different so they would stand out.)

Excerpt )

I would really recommend this book to people wanting to find out more about mormonism while also reading what is essentially a crime novel. The author is very good at inserting details of Mormon beliefs and cultural life into the narrative without interrupting the flow of the novel. I would really like to read more by her.

CBB Book a Week challenge 2008
1/52, Stasiland by Anna Funder
2/52, The Nazis, A Warning from History by Laurence Rees
3/52, A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett
lizziec: (me - phil'sfirstchristmas)
I did start a third book, Boldness Be My Friend but A Little Princess turned up so I read it first - over the course of an evening, because I found it un-put-down-able. I realise it's a children's book, but I've never read it before and recently wanted to. I don't know why I didn't read it when I was younger - I have devoured The Secret Garden on many occasions and it's one of those books I keep going back to. I suspect A Little Princess will be similar in that.

3/52, A Little Princess )
lizziec: (me - phil'sfirstchristmas)
I did start a third book, Boldness Be My Friend but A Little Princess turned up so I read it first - over the course of an evening, because I found it un-put-down-able. I realise it's a children's book, but I've never read it before and recently wanted to. I don't know why I didn't read it when I was younger - I have devoured The Secret Garden on many occasions and it's one of those books I keep going back to. I suspect A Little Princess will be similar in that.

3/52, A Little Princess )
lizziec: (me - phil'sfirstchristmas)
I did start a third book, Boldness Be My Friend but A Little Princess turned up so I read it first - over the course of an evening, because I found it un-put-down-able. I realise it's a children's book, but I've never read it before and recently wanted to. I don't know why I didn't read it when I was younger - I have devoured The Secret Garden on many occasions and it's one of those books I keep going back to. I suspect A Little Princess will be similar in that.

3/52, A Little Princess )
lizziec: (potterpuffs - sphinx idiots)
Via Respectful Insolence, "The downfall of HD-DVD". Very funny, even if you haven't actually seen Downfall (and if you haven't, you should :P)



In other news, Book 2/52, The Nazis, A Warning from History )
lizziec: (bookshop)
My first book of 2008 in the CBB Book a Week challenge 2008 has been Stasiland by Anna Funder. I brought it after Christmas with some Waterstones vouchers I had been given.

It's a series of stories written by an Australian who lived and worked in Berlin after Germany was reunited and began looking into stories of those who found themselves on the wrong side of it. There were accounts by people who had worked for the Stasi and those whose lives had been ruined by it. There were brief rundowns of the way in which the GDR (German Democratic Republic also known as East Germany) and the Stasi were run. It is very interesting and I couldn't put it down - I would recommend it to anyone who wants an idea how these organisations worked and their impact on people's lives but only had a very hazy idea before picking up the book. I could have told you what the GDR and Stasi were before, but now I have a much better understanding and want to read more. It is also truly scary in parts:

Radiation to track suspects )

On the levels of surveillance and infiltration of informers in all aspects of GDR life )

It also brought my attention to the "puzzle-women" of the File Authority. As the GDR collapsed the Stasi attempted to destroy by electronic shredder, and when those failed, by hand, the files it held on their own citizens. (which back to back would have stretched for more than 100 miles). The fragments from these were held in sacks and with the manpower available to piece them back together it would have taken more than 400 years to repair all the files that had been shredded (still more were not destroyed and are available for former East Germans to view - many now want to see their own files). The BBC News has a recent story about the switch to computers in the hope that the job will be completed sooner. It is fascinating.

In all a very very interesting book that leads me to want to read more about the GDR and the Stasi.

lizziec: (bookshop)
My first book of 2008 in the CBB Book a Week challenge 2008 has been Stasiland by Anna Funder. I brought it after Christmas with some Waterstones vouchers I had been given.

It's a series of stories written by an Australian who lived and worked in Berlin after Germany was reunited and began looking into stories of those who found themselves on the wrong side of it. There were accounts by people who had worked for the Stasi and those whose lives had been ruined by it. There were brief rundowns of the way in which the GDR (German Democratic Republic also known as East Germany) and the Stasi were run. It is very interesting and I couldn't put it down - I would recommend it to anyone who wants an idea how these organisations worked and their impact on people's lives but only had a very hazy idea before picking up the book. I could have told you what the GDR and Stasi were before, but now I have a much better understanding and want to read more. It is also truly scary in parts:

Radiation to track suspects )

On the levels of surveillance and infiltration of informers in all aspects of GDR life )

It also brought my attention to the "puzzle-women" of the File Authority. As the GDR collapsed the Stasi attempted to destroy by electronic shredder, and when those failed, by hand, the files it held on their own citizens. (which back to back would have stretched for more than 100 miles). The fragments from these were held in sacks and with the manpower available to piece them back together it would have taken more than 400 years to repair all the files that had been shredded (still more were not destroyed and are available for former East Germans to view - many now want to see their own files). The BBC News has a recent story about the switch to computers in the hope that the job will be completed sooner. It is fascinating.

In all a very very interesting book that leads me to want to read more about the GDR and the Stasi.

lizziec: (bookshop)
My first book of 2008 in the CBB Book a Week challenge 2008 has been Stasiland by Anna Funder. I brought it after Christmas with some Waterstones vouchers I had been given.

It's a series of stories written by an Australian who lived and worked in Berlin after Germany was reunited and began looking into stories of those who found themselves on the wrong side of it. There were accounts by people who had worked for the Stasi and those whose lives had been ruined by it. There were brief rundowns of the way in which the GDR (German Democratic Republic also known as East Germany) and the Stasi were run. It is very interesting and I couldn't put it down - I would recommend it to anyone who wants an idea how these organisations worked and their impact on people's lives but only had a very hazy idea before picking up the book. I could have told you what the GDR and Stasi were before, but now I have a much better understanding and want to read more. It is also truly scary in parts:

Radiation to track suspects )

On the levels of surveillance and infiltration of informers in all aspects of GDR life )

It also brought my attention to the "puzzle-women" of the File Authority. As the GDR collapsed the Stasi attempted to destroy by electronic shredder, and when those failed, by hand, the files it held on their own citizens. (which back to back would have stretched for more than 100 miles). The fragments from these were held in sacks and with the manpower available to piece them back together it would have taken more than 400 years to repair all the files that had been shredded (still more were not destroyed and are available for former East Germans to view - many now want to see their own files). The BBC News has a recent story about the switch to computers in the hope that the job will be completed sooner. It is fascinating.

In all a very very interesting book that leads me to want to read more about the GDR and the Stasi.
lizziec: (Robin Hood (Errol Flynn))
The Chalet Bulletin Board is having a Book a Week challenge for 2008 and I have decided to take part.

It would be a personal challenge to read at least one book a week so non-competitive, although I think the titles of the books read should be listed on CBB, along with author and a brief description or opinion if you felt like it.

Rules would be:
1) No rereads allowed towards bookcount
2) As long as you have 52 by the end of the year, that is fine. A book a week means on average.


As I read them I am also planning on saying at least a little bit here about each one. Perhaps more than a little bit if it takes my fancy :)

A meme I have stolen from Phil )

Finally, a very happy birthday to my lovely husband, ben ([livejournal.com profile] benc) (who has been featured in the LA Times this week!)
lizziec: (Robin Hood (Errol Flynn))
The Chalet Bulletin Board is having a Book a Week challenge for 2008 and I have decided to take part.

It would be a personal challenge to read at least one book a week so non-competitive, although I think the titles of the books read should be listed on CBB, along with author and a brief description or opinion if you felt like it.

Rules would be:
1) No rereads allowed towards bookcount
2) As long as you have 52 by the end of the year, that is fine. A book a week means on average.


As I read them I am also planning on saying at least a little bit here about each one. Perhaps more than a little bit if it takes my fancy :)

A meme I have stolen from Phil )

Finally, a very happy birthday to my lovely husband, ben ([livejournal.com profile] benc) (who has been featured in the LA Times this week!)
lizziec: (Robin Hood (Errol Flynn))
The Chalet Bulletin Board is having a Book a Week challenge for 2008 and I have decided to take part.

It would be a personal challenge to read at least one book a week so non-competitive, although I think the titles of the books read should be listed on CBB, along with author and a brief description or opinion if you felt like it.

Rules would be:
1) No rereads allowed towards bookcount
2) As long as you have 52 by the end of the year, that is fine. A book a week means on average.


As I read them I am also planning on saying at least a little bit here about each one. Perhaps more than a little bit if it takes my fancy :)

A meme I have stolen from Phil )

Finally, a very happy birthday to my lovely husband, ben ([livejournal.com profile] benc) (who has been featured in the LA Times this week!)
lizziec: (Default)
Since December started I have been burning my advent candle:

opening my advent calendar (from Thorntons, mmm :)):

and looking at how pretty our tree is:
.

Pressies were brought and wrapped and on Christmas Eve )

And so Christmas Day dawned )

Boxing Day started bright and early... ) And then the Mormons turned up ) In the evening we watched part of Jeff Wayne's The War of the Worlds in Concert and then I switched over to watch Ballet Shoes )

Phew. That was a very long update. If I updated more often then I daresay I would not post such long rambling entries. Ah well :)

lizziec: (Default)
Since December started I have been burning my advent candle:

opening my advent calendar (from Thorntons, mmm :)):

and looking at how pretty our tree is:
.

Pressies were brought and wrapped and on Christmas Eve )

And so Christmas Day dawned )

Boxing Day started bright and early... ) And then the Mormons turned up ) In the evening we watched part of Jeff Wayne's The War of the Worlds in Concert and then I switched over to watch Ballet Shoes )

Phew. That was a very long update. If I updated more often then I daresay I would not post such long rambling entries. Ah well :)

lizziec: (Default)
Since December started I have been burning my advent candle:

opening my advent calendar (from Thorntons, mmm :)):

and looking at how pretty our tree is:
.

Pressies were brought and wrapped and on Christmas Eve )

And so Christmas Day dawned )

Boxing Day started bright and early... ) And then the Mormons turned up ) In the evening we watched part of Jeff Wayne's The War of the Worlds in Concert and then I switched over to watch Ballet Shoes )

Phew. That was a very long update. If I updated more often then I daresay I would not post such long rambling entries. Ah well :)
lizziec: (apod - Venus)
Happy Easter to those who believe. I hope it's been a good one :)

I have spent a very relaxing day pottering about our (newly spring cleaned and rearranged - epic effort lasting 3 days and 12 sacks of stuff to be got rid of [an lj post in itself]) flat, pottering up to a friend's house to feed a bunny, then on to the fields beyond to look at the lambs (fitting for Easter Sunday I feel). Came home and listened to our official downloaded copy of the BNL concert we went to only a week and a bit ago and read Blood, Sweat and Tea lent to me by [livejournal.com profile] no1typo while keeping an eye on irc. Now [livejournal.com profile] benc is cooking dinner (Cardamom and Honey Chicken with CousCous) and it smells lovely. Not a bad way at all to spend an afternoon :) I feel very relaxed now!

I have few eggs this year as compared to other years (medium Chocolate Orange one from Mum, a small smarties one and a cadbury's chick from Ben and a packet of minieggs from myself - added to later by two boxes of chocolates from Sue [Green and Blacks bitesize - Squeeeeeee {also some luxury chocs from someone I've never heard of, but they're very nice} and not one of the chocolates contains nuts! Yay! She's very clever :D]), but much to my suprise I haven't touched any of this stash of chocolate yet!

Maybe after dinner...
lizziec: (apod - Venus)
Happy Easter to those who believe. I hope it's been a good one :)

I have spent a very relaxing day pottering about our (newly spring cleaned and rearranged - epic effort lasting 3 days and 12 sacks of stuff to be got rid of [an lj post in itself]) flat, pottering up to a friend's house to feed a bunny, then on to the fields beyond to look at the lambs (fitting for Easter Sunday I feel). Came home and listened to our official downloaded copy of the BNL concert we went to only a week and a bit ago and read Blood, Sweat and Tea lent to me by [livejournal.com profile] no1typo while keeping an eye on irc. Now [livejournal.com profile] benc is cooking dinner (Cardamom and Honey Chicken with CousCous) and it smells lovely. Not a bad way at all to spend an afternoon :) I feel very relaxed now!

I have few eggs this year as compared to other years (medium Chocolate Orange one from Mum, a small smarties one and a cadbury's chick from Ben and a packet of minieggs from myself - added to later by two boxes of chocolates from Sue [Green and Blacks bitesize - Squeeeeeee {also some luxury chocs from someone I've never heard of, but they're very nice} and not one of the chocolates contains nuts! Yay! She's very clever :D]), but much to my suprise I haven't touched any of this stash of chocolate yet!

Maybe after dinner...
lizziec: (apod - Venus)
Happy Easter to those who believe. I hope it's been a good one :)

I have spent a very relaxing day pottering about our (newly spring cleaned and rearranged - epic effort lasting 3 days and 12 sacks of stuff to be got rid of [an lj post in itself]) flat, pottering up to a friend's house to feed a bunny, then on to the fields beyond to look at the lambs (fitting for Easter Sunday I feel). Came home and listened to our official downloaded copy of the BNL concert we went to only a week and a bit ago and read Blood, Sweat and Tea lent to me by [livejournal.com profile] no1typo while keeping an eye on irc. Now [livejournal.com profile] benc is cooking dinner (Cardamom and Honey Chicken with CousCous) and it smells lovely. Not a bad way at all to spend an afternoon :) I feel very relaxed now!

I have few eggs this year as compared to other years (medium Chocolate Orange one from Mum, a small smarties one and a cadbury's chick from Ben and a packet of minieggs from myself - added to later by two boxes of chocolates from Sue [Green and Blacks bitesize - Squeeeeeee {also some luxury chocs from someone I've never heard of, but they're very nice} and not one of the chocolates contains nuts! Yay! She's very clever :D]), but much to my suprise I haven't touched any of this stash of chocolate yet!

Maybe after dinner...
lizziec: (bookshop)
First of all, Congratulations to my very first boyfriend, [livejournal.com profile] bonadish who has just got engaged! I'm keeping 2009 free for you sweetie ;)

Secondly I'm in a bit of a quandry when it comes to books. This doesn't often happened, but I've been a bit overwhelmed of late as [livejournal.com profile] benc brought me 3 books from Girls Gone By Publishers so yesterday 3 new Chalet School books I've never read before arrived (Jo to the Rescue, Joey and Co in Tyrol, Challenge for the Chalet School). In addition to this, mum lent me "Blood, Sweat and Tea" by Tom Reynolds (of Random Acts of Reality). As a result of this I'm feeling rather spoilt for choice. I normally have two books on the go at once but four is rather overkill, even I admit that.

I think I've solved the problem for now. I'm reading Reynolds book at night cos it's more episodic and much easier to stop when I'm tired, and the Chalet School books in series order during the day. Hopefully there are enough days left of my holiday to read them all before I go back.

Still, better to have too much book choice than not enough!
lizziec: (bookshop)
First of all, Congratulations to my very first boyfriend, [livejournal.com profile] bonadish who has just got engaged! I'm keeping 2009 free for you sweetie ;)

Secondly I'm in a bit of a quandry when it comes to books. This doesn't often happened, but I've been a bit overwhelmed of late as [livejournal.com profile] benc brought me 3 books from Girls Gone By Publishers so yesterday 3 new Chalet School books I've never read before arrived (Jo to the Rescue, Joey and Co in Tyrol, Challenge for the Chalet School). In addition to this, mum lent me "Blood, Sweat and Tea" by Tom Reynolds (of Random Acts of Reality). As a result of this I'm feeling rather spoilt for choice. I normally have two books on the go at once but four is rather overkill, even I admit that.

I think I've solved the problem for now. I'm reading Reynolds book at night cos it's more episodic and much easier to stop when I'm tired, and the Chalet School books in series order during the day. Hopefully there are enough days left of my holiday to read them all before I go back.

Still, better to have too much book choice than not enough!
lizziec: (bookshop)
First of all, Congratulations to my very first boyfriend, [livejournal.com profile] bonadish who has just got engaged! I'm keeping 2009 free for you sweetie ;)

Secondly I'm in a bit of a quandry when it comes to books. This doesn't often happened, but I've been a bit overwhelmed of late as [livejournal.com profile] benc brought me 3 books from Girls Gone By Publishers so yesterday 3 new Chalet School books I've never read before arrived (Jo to the Rescue, Joey and Co in Tyrol, Challenge for the Chalet School). In addition to this, mum lent me "Blood, Sweat and Tea" by Tom Reynolds (of Random Acts of Reality). As a result of this I'm feeling rather spoilt for choice. I normally have two books on the go at once but four is rather overkill, even I admit that.

I think I've solved the problem for now. I'm reading Reynolds book at night cos it's more episodic and much easier to stop when I'm tired, and the Chalet School books in series order during the day. Hopefully there are enough days left of my holiday to read them all before I go back.

Still, better to have too much book choice than not enough!
lizziec: (bookshop)
[livejournal.com profile] benc has been tormenting me all morning with "I know something you don't know" and finally, at lunchtime, revealed what it was.

A Chalet School book. A rare Chalet School book. A first edition, hard back, rare Chalet School book.

SQUEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE :D

It's Changes for the Chalet School. Now I only have 7 left to get before I have the whole set in some form or another (it's a rather hodge-podge collection - list here) and three of those are either out now or being re-released soon by GGBP *bounces* :D
lizziec: (bookshop)
[livejournal.com profile] benc has been tormenting me all morning with "I know something you don't know" and finally, at lunchtime, revealed what it was.

A Chalet School book. A rare Chalet School book. A first edition, hard back, rare Chalet School book.

SQUEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE :D

It's Changes for the Chalet School. Now I only have 7 left to get before I have the whole set in some form or another (it's a rather hodge-podge collection - list here) and three of those are either out now or being re-released soon by GGBP *bounces* :D
lizziec: (bookshop)
[livejournal.com profile] benc has been tormenting me all morning with "I know something you don't know" and finally, at lunchtime, revealed what it was.

A Chalet School book. A rare Chalet School book. A first edition, hard back, rare Chalet School book.

SQUEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE :D

It's Changes for the Chalet School. Now I only have 7 left to get before I have the whole set in some form or another (it's a rather hodge-podge collection - list here) and three of those are either out now or being re-released soon by GGBP *bounces* :D
lizziec: (bookshop)
I'm gonna read you little booky! Booky, booky, booky, booky, booky!

Look! :D )

My new books arrived this morning :D At 9:17am I took delivery of The End and Sharpe's Fury. Added to Althea Joins the Chalet School I got last friday and have yet to finish I have a delicious weekend of book reading ahead of me. (All links contain spoilers...)

Yay!

I'm very much looking forward to this weekend at the moment :)
lizziec: (bookshop)
I'm gonna read you little booky! Booky, booky, booky, booky, booky!

Look! :D )

My new books arrived this morning :D At 9:17am I took delivery of The End and Sharpe's Fury. Added to Althea Joins the Chalet School I got last friday and have yet to finish I have a delicious weekend of book reading ahead of me. (All links contain spoilers...)

Yay!

I'm very much looking forward to this weekend at the moment :)
lizziec: (bookshop)
I'm gonna read you little booky! Booky, booky, booky, booky, booky!

Look! :D )

My new books arrived this morning :D At 9:17am I took delivery of The End and Sharpe's Fury. Added to Althea Joins the Chalet School I got last friday and have yet to finish I have a delicious weekend of book reading ahead of me. (All links contain spoilers...)

Yay!

I'm very much looking forward to this weekend at the moment :)
lizziec: (Stargate SG1 Jack O'Neill (two l's ;)))
I've recently been watching the TV reruns on BBC4 of I, Claudius. It's very good. Full of death and stuff. My friend Sue introduced me to it and now I'm somewhat hooked. Fifth episode tonight. I fully recommend it to you if you have BBC4 and time free at 9 tonight. There are 7 more episodes after tonights. Watch it! :D

When [livejournal.com profile] no1typo found out I'd been watching it and wanted to read the books, she brought me them. The first "I, Claudius" and "Horrible Histories: York" arrived yesterday. The second "Claudius the God" should hopefully turn up soon. I'm so excited :D

My teaching certificate from the GTC turned up today, complete with my DFES number on. I only have to pay £33 to the GTC (essentially a Government Quango) and I will be a fully registered and qualified teacher :D

Had [livejournal.com profile] red_pill to stay last week. It was good, I'd missed having him around and he can be very good company. His pictures (including some funky pictures of half grown up duckings with their funny stumpy wings taken at Keynes Pond) can be found here. There are also some pictures of Cane Hill, Shakeaway in Croydon and Tapas at typos, which all pretty much sums up the last weekend of July. Tapas was thoroughly excellent and a good time was had by all. Got to know [livejournal.com profile] cutter666 better, which was nice, and saw lots of Xiphi, Si, [livejournal.com profile] bethanthepurple, foo, rah, the-moof-mother and her partner, mop, [livejournal.com profile] bleandweller, azz and many others.

Doing clearing hotline for the Uni next week. Puts off the panic of finding a proper job for a bit longer.

All's good at the moment. Yay!
lizziec: (Stargate SG1 Jack O'Neill (two l's ;)))
I've recently been watching the TV reruns on BBC4 of I, Claudius. It's very good. Full of death and stuff. My friend Sue introduced me to it and now I'm somewhat hooked. Fifth episode tonight. I fully recommend it to you if you have BBC4 and time free at 9 tonight. There are 7 more episodes after tonights. Watch it! :D

When [livejournal.com profile] no1typo found out I'd been watching it and wanted to read the books, she brought me them. The first "I, Claudius" and "Horrible Histories: York" arrived yesterday. The second "Claudius the God" should hopefully turn up soon. I'm so excited :D

My teaching certificate from the GTC turned up today, complete with my DFES number on. I only have to pay £33 to the GTC (essentially a Government Quango) and I will be a fully registered and qualified teacher :D

Had [livejournal.com profile] red_pill to stay last week. It was good, I'd missed having him around and he can be very good company. His pictures (including some funky pictures of half grown up duckings with their funny stumpy wings taken at Keynes Pond) can be found here. There are also some pictures of Cane Hill, Shakeaway in Croydon and Tapas at typos, which all pretty much sums up the last weekend of July. Tapas was thoroughly excellent and a good time was had by all. Got to know [livejournal.com profile] cutter666 better, which was nice, and saw lots of Xiphi, Si, [livejournal.com profile] bethanthepurple, foo, rah, the-moof-mother and her partner, mop, [livejournal.com profile] bleandweller, azz and many others.

Doing clearing hotline for the Uni next week. Puts off the panic of finding a proper job for a bit longer.

All's good at the moment. Yay!
lizziec: (Stargate SG1 Jack O'Neill (two l's ;)))
I've recently been watching the TV reruns on BBC4 of I, Claudius. It's very good. Full of death and stuff. My friend Sue introduced me to it and now I'm somewhat hooked. Fifth episode tonight. I fully recommend it to you if you have BBC4 and time free at 9 tonight. There are 7 more episodes after tonights. Watch it! :D

When [livejournal.com profile] no1typo found out I'd been watching it and wanted to read the books, she brought me them. The first "I, Claudius" and "Horrible Histories: York" arrived yesterday. The second "Claudius the God" should hopefully turn up soon. I'm so excited :D

My teaching certificate from the GTC turned up today, complete with my DFES number on. I only have to pay £33 to the GTC (essentially a Government Quango) and I will be a fully registered and qualified teacher :D

Had [livejournal.com profile] red_pill to stay last week. It was good, I'd missed having him around and he can be very good company. His pictures (including some funky pictures of half grown up duckings with their funny stumpy wings taken at Keynes Pond) can be found here. There are also some pictures of Cane Hill, Shakeaway in Croydon and Tapas at typos, which all pretty much sums up the last weekend of July. Tapas was thoroughly excellent and a good time was had by all. Got to know [livejournal.com profile] cutter666 better, which was nice, and saw lots of Xiphi, Si, [livejournal.com profile] bethanthepurple, foo, rah, the-moof-mother and her partner, mop, [livejournal.com profile] bleandweller, azz and many others.

Doing clearing hotline for the Uni next week. Puts off the panic of finding a proper job for a bit longer.

All's good at the moment. Yay!
lizziec: (Stargate SG1 Sam Carter)
I was perusing the TES Staffroom (a forum for teachers) when I came across this website with free books on it. They're children's books, but there are fiction and non fiction books on a variety of subjects, including the Just So Stories.

Win :)
lizziec: (Stargate SG1 Sam Carter)
I was perusing the TES Staffroom (a forum for teachers) when I came across this website with free books on it. They're children's books, but there are fiction and non fiction books on a variety of subjects, including the Just So Stories.

Win :)

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