lizziec: (Horrible Histories Dick Turpin (noose))
Had a random moment the other day when I was googling mum's name and came across this news story published a year and a half after she died, using a photo she took and put on flickr under creative commons as the story picture.

Bus Posse
This one.


I think that's unbelievably cool. It made me both smile, and be a little bit sad.

Thanks to those who helped me find the pic on flickr after I got sad enough that I could no longer look.

This entry was originally posted at http://lizziec.dreamwidth.org/433857.html. There are currently comment count unavailable comments on the original entry.
lizziec: (Horrible Histories Dick Turpin (noose))
Had a random moment the other day when I was googling mum's name and came across this news story published a year and a half after she died, using a photo she took and put on flickr under creative commons as the story picture.

Bus Posse
This one.


I think that's unbelievably cool. It made me both smile, and be a little bit sad.

Thanks to those who helped me find the pic on flickr after I got sad enough that I could no longer look.

This entry was originally posted at http://lizziec.dreamwidth.org/433857.html. There are currently comment count unavailable comments on the original entry.
lizziec: (Horrible Histories Dick Turpin (noose))
Had a random moment the other day when I was googling mum's name and came across this news story published a year and a half after she died, using a photo she took and put on flickr under creative commons as the story picture.

Bus Posse
This one.


I think that's unbelievably cool. It made me both smile, and be a little bit sad.

Thanks to those who helped me find the pic on flickr after I got sad enough that I could no longer look.
lizziec: (LDS- Young women)
I know this isn't really, or shouldn't really be, the first concern of anyone hearing about the huge earthquake in Chile but this just struck me and I wanted to ramble briefly on LJ about it. It truly doesn't mean I'm being callous about the victims or anything.

Hi, I'm Lizzie and I'm an ex-mormon. I've been out for around 7 years. There are still some things I do, or largely don't do, like not really drinking alcohol at all, ever, and not drinking tea and coffee, that flag me as culturally mormon (I never got into the habit of drinking them after I left), but more and more I find that I just don't think about Mormons or Mormonism much any more. Which is actually quite nice.

When I woke up this morning and heard about the 8.8 magnitude earthquake in Chile my thoughts went to just one thing, which really irritated me as soon as I realised what had happened in my brain. The first thing I thought, coming so soon after the Haiti earthquake was "It's the latter-days" (According to LDS Church teachings...It is...believed that there will be increasingly severe wars, earthquakes, hurricanes, and other man-made and natural disasters prior to the Second Coming.)

When I was growing up the fact that I was part of a priviledged generation who would be around for the Latter Days and Second Coming was constantly brought up in Primary and Young Women and Sunday School. In it, the thought both scared and inspired me. Out of it, I would imagine they've been saying this stuff to every up-and-coming generation since the formation of the church.

As time has gone on since I left, these irrational moments, where my brain falls back in the first instance to Mormon teachings happen less and less, but I'm finding they irritate me more when they do happen, like this morning.

Seriously brain, WTF?

(Cross posted to [livejournal.com profile] exmormon)

lizziec: (LDS- Young women)
I know this isn't really, or shouldn't really be, the first concern of anyone hearing about the huge earthquake in Chile but this just struck me and I wanted to ramble briefly on LJ about it. It truly doesn't mean I'm being callous about the victims or anything.

Hi, I'm Lizzie and I'm an ex-mormon. I've been out for around 7 years. There are still some things I do, or largely don't do, like not really drinking alcohol at all, ever, and not drinking tea and coffee, that flag me as culturally mormon (I never got into the habit of drinking them after I left), but more and more I find that I just don't think about Mormons or Mormonism much any more. Which is actually quite nice.

When I woke up this morning and heard about the 8.8 magnitude earthquake in Chile my thoughts went to just one thing, which really irritated me as soon as I realised what had happened in my brain. The first thing I thought, coming so soon after the Haiti earthquake was "It's the latter-days" (According to LDS Church teachings...It is...believed that there will be increasingly severe wars, earthquakes, hurricanes, and other man-made and natural disasters prior to the Second Coming.)

When I was growing up the fact that I was part of a priviledged generation who would be around for the Latter Days and Second Coming was constantly brought up in Primary and Young Women and Sunday School. In it, the thought both scared and inspired me. Out of it, I would imagine they've been saying this stuff to every up-and-coming generation since the formation of the church.

As time has gone on since I left, these irrational moments, where my brain falls back in the first instance to Mormon teachings happen less and less, but I'm finding they irritate me more when they do happen, like this morning.

Seriously brain, WTF?

(Cross posted to [livejournal.com profile] exmormon)

lizziec: (LDS- Young women)
I know this isn't really, or shouldn't really be, the first concern of anyone hearing about the huge earthquake in Chile but this just struck me and I wanted to ramble briefly on LJ about it. It truly doesn't mean I'm being callous about the victims or anything.

Hi, I'm Lizzie and I'm an ex-mormon. I've been out for around 7 years. There are still some things I do, or largely don't do, like not really drinking alcohol at all, ever, and not drinking tea and coffee, that flag me as culturally mormon (I never got into the habit of drinking them after I left), but more and more I find that I just don't think about Mormons or Mormonism much any more. Which is actually quite nice.

When I woke up this morning and heard about the 8.8 magnitude earthquake in Chile my thoughts went to just one thing, which really irritated me as soon as I realised what had happened in my brain. The first thing I thought, coming so soon after the Haiti earthquake was "It's the latter-days" (According to LDS Church teachings...It is...believed that there will be increasingly severe wars, earthquakes, hurricanes, and other man-made and natural disasters prior to the Second Coming.)

When I was growing up the fact that I was part of a priviledged generation who would be around for the Latter Days and Second Coming was constantly brought up in Primary and Young Women and Sunday School. In it, the thought both scared and inspired me. Out of it, I would imagine they've been saying this stuff to every up-and-coming generation since the formation of the church.

As time has gone on since I left, these irrational moments, where my brain falls back in the first instance to Mormon teachings happen less and less, but I'm finding they irritate me more when they do happen, like this morning.

Seriously brain, WTF?

(Cross posted to [livejournal.com profile] exmormon)
lizziec: (XKCD sheeple)
I'm currently feeling rather annoyed by this. " All travel plans to be tracked by Government". Under the plans, starting to be brought in already: "Anyone departing the UK by land, sea or air will have their trip recorded and stored on a database for a decade."

I don't know where to start on this, or what annoys me most. Perhaps it is the justifcation from the government:

"The changes are being brought in as the Government tries to tighten border controls and increase protection against the threat of international terrorism."


How does tracking people leaving the country and holding the details for 10 years protect us against terrorism? This comes across as a standard line from the government, much like how ID cards will apparently protect us, even if they didn't protect the people of Madrid.

Or it might be the "condemnation" of the plans by Chris Grayling, the home affairs spokesman for the Conservatives:

""Of course we need to keep a proper record of people as they come in and leave the country.

"My worry is that the Government is creating something which will be unwieldy, impossible to manage and expensive to operate.

"I think this system has to be much simpler."
"


I don't know about you, but that doesn't sound much like it's condemning the plans to me.

Grrrr. This government is making me so annoyed with plans like this I barely know where to start. As soon as one lot are withdrawn, another lot comes up. I'm starting to feel quite worn down by it all.
lizziec: (XKCD sheeple)
I'm currently feeling rather annoyed by this. " All travel plans to be tracked by Government". Under the plans, starting to be brought in already: "Anyone departing the UK by land, sea or air will have their trip recorded and stored on a database for a decade."

I don't know where to start on this, or what annoys me most. Perhaps it is the justifcation from the government:

"The changes are being brought in as the Government tries to tighten border controls and increase protection against the threat of international terrorism."


How does tracking people leaving the country and holding the details for 10 years protect us against terrorism? This comes across as a standard line from the government, much like how ID cards will apparently protect us, even if they didn't protect the people of Madrid.

Or it might be the "condemnation" of the plans by Chris Grayling, the home affairs spokesman for the Conservatives:

""Of course we need to keep a proper record of people as they come in and leave the country.

"My worry is that the Government is creating something which will be unwieldy, impossible to manage and expensive to operate.

"I think this system has to be much simpler."
"


I don't know about you, but that doesn't sound much like it's condemning the plans to me.

Grrrr. This government is making me so annoyed with plans like this I barely know where to start. As soon as one lot are withdrawn, another lot comes up. I'm starting to feel quite worn down by it all.
lizziec: (XKCD sheeple)
I'm currently feeling rather annoyed by this. " All travel plans to be tracked by Government". Under the plans, starting to be brought in already: "Anyone departing the UK by land, sea or air will have their trip recorded and stored on a database for a decade."

I don't know where to start on this, or what annoys me most. Perhaps it is the justifcation from the government:

"The changes are being brought in as the Government tries to tighten border controls and increase protection against the threat of international terrorism."


How does tracking people leaving the country and holding the details for 10 years protect us against terrorism? This comes across as a standard line from the government, much like how ID cards will apparently protect us, even if they didn't protect the people of Madrid.

Or it might be the "condemnation" of the plans by Chris Grayling, the home affairs spokesman for the Conservatives:

""Of course we need to keep a proper record of people as they come in and leave the country.

"My worry is that the Government is creating something which will be unwieldy, impossible to manage and expensive to operate.

"I think this system has to be much simpler."
"


I don't know about you, but that doesn't sound much like it's condemning the plans to me.

Grrrr. This government is making me so annoyed with plans like this I barely know where to start. As soon as one lot are withdrawn, another lot comes up. I'm starting to feel quite worn down by it all.
lizziec: (animals - badgers)
Last Monday [livejournal.com profile] red_pill was down for a visit, so we did the touristy thing and went to Wildwood to see all the cute animals.

We started off at Canterbury Asda, where Phil got some new jeans and I went all arty on the place with my camera.

See my arty turn )

From there we proceeded to Wildwood. We chose Wildwood on the grounds that I've been before and Phil has been dying to see the cute British animals they have there for over a year. I took loads of pictures, but lots had to be deleted as they were mostly very good pictures of fences or perspex windows ;) Some of the pictures aren't as clear as I'd like them to be, but they were all taken through fences or windows, so I don't think they're too bad, given the circumstances and my lack of skill :)

All the signs had a badger theme: )

We also found a sign that clearly needed fixing - the 'preferred habitat' and 'favourite food' sections had obviously become switched at some point: )

We saw lots of animals on our travels including (but not limited to):
A red fox. )

Water birds of various types. )

Cranes (at least, I think this is a Crane ;)) )

Sleeping Arctic Foxes. )

Wild horses. )

Various types of Deer. I think this one is Fallow Deer. )

Tawny Owls. )

A sleeping polecat. )

Sleeping Badgers. )

A weasel - at least, I'm fairly sure it's a weasel. Getting a clear picture of it was extremely difficult. It's extremely fast and agile. )

Brief comedy interlude:
What's the difference between a Stoat and a Weasel?
I'm so funny )

A sleeping Lynx. )

Wolves. These were also difficult to get pictures of. I never realised how quick they were before - they all came out slightly blurry. )

Sheep. )

And Black Rats. I'm rather pleased with this picture, which was a complete fluke. )

Of course, there were lots of other animals we saw, but those are my best pictures. For the rest, see here.

Here you see the Philip Overal ('reddus pillus') in his natural habitat. )

Also on a swing... )

...and a mini-zipwire. )

We got told off shortly after that picture was taken by an eight year old who told us that the playground was only for children. We couldn't find any signs to say so though, so I have a clear conscience :). I also had a go on the zipwire. T'was good fun, even if my first go was with my eyes shut and I wouldn't let Phil give me a push off ;)

This is always good advice: )

Some camera and lens porn (SFW - not actual porn) for camera geeks: )

Philip and Little Bunny Foo-Foo pose for a picture: )

It turned out that he had worn his dressing gown to Wildwood. Arthur Dent's influence on his childhood and later life can not be overstated. )

We had lunch at The Parrot (the pub formerly known as Simple Simon's). Pictures here. Food was lovely :)

Finally we explored the River Stour a little.

It was a beautiful spring day, with the sky reflecting in the river. )

Spring is truly springing: )

Some cool throwbacks to the time when there was a mill on this particular section of the river: )

Phil got very close to the river in search of pictures. Unfortunately he didn't fall in. That might have been funny. )

It was a really nice day :)

Asda.
Wildwood.
The Parrot.
The River Stour.
Phil's pictures of the day.

lizziec: (animals - badgers)
Last Monday [livejournal.com profile] red_pill was down for a visit, so we did the touristy thing and went to Wildwood to see all the cute animals.

We started off at Canterbury Asda, where Phil got some new jeans and I went all arty on the place with my camera.

See my arty turn )

From there we proceeded to Wildwood. We chose Wildwood on the grounds that I've been before and Phil has been dying to see the cute British animals they have there for over a year. I took loads of pictures, but lots had to be deleted as they were mostly very good pictures of fences or perspex windows ;) Some of the pictures aren't as clear as I'd like them to be, but they were all taken through fences or windows, so I don't think they're too bad, given the circumstances and my lack of skill :)

All the signs had a badger theme: )

We also found a sign that clearly needed fixing - the 'preferred habitat' and 'favourite food' sections had obviously become switched at some point: )

We saw lots of animals on our travels including (but not limited to):
A red fox. )

Water birds of various types. )

Cranes (at least, I think this is a Crane ;)) )

Sleeping Arctic Foxes. )

Wild horses. )

Various types of Deer. I think this one is Fallow Deer. )

Tawny Owls. )

A sleeping polecat. )

Sleeping Badgers. )

A weasel - at least, I'm fairly sure it's a weasel. Getting a clear picture of it was extremely difficult. It's extremely fast and agile. )

Brief comedy interlude:
What's the difference between a Stoat and a Weasel?
I'm so funny )

A sleeping Lynx. )

Wolves. These were also difficult to get pictures of. I never realised how quick they were before - they all came out slightly blurry. )

Sheep. )

And Black Rats. I'm rather pleased with this picture, which was a complete fluke. )

Of course, there were lots of other animals we saw, but those are my best pictures. For the rest, see here.

Here you see the Philip Overal ('reddus pillus') in his natural habitat. )

Also on a swing... )

...and a mini-zipwire. )

We got told off shortly after that picture was taken by an eight year old who told us that the playground was only for children. We couldn't find any signs to say so though, so I have a clear conscience :). I also had a go on the zipwire. T'was good fun, even if my first go was with my eyes shut and I wouldn't let Phil give me a push off ;)

This is always good advice: )

Some camera and lens porn (SFW - not actual porn) for camera geeks: )

Philip and Little Bunny Foo-Foo pose for a picture: )

It turned out that he had worn his dressing gown to Wildwood. Arthur Dent's influence on his childhood and later life can not be overstated. )

We had lunch at The Parrot (the pub formerly known as Simple Simon's). Pictures here. Food was lovely :)

Finally we explored the River Stour a little.

It was a beautiful spring day, with the sky reflecting in the river. )

Spring is truly springing: )

Some cool throwbacks to the time when there was a mill on this particular section of the river: )

Phil got very close to the river in search of pictures. Unfortunately he didn't fall in. That might have been funny. )

It was a really nice day :)

Asda.
Wildwood.
The Parrot.
The River Stour.
Phil's pictures of the day.

lizziec: (animals - badgers)
Last Monday [livejournal.com profile] red_pill was down for a visit, so we did the touristy thing and went to Wildwood to see all the cute animals.

We started off at Canterbury Asda, where Phil got some new jeans and I went all arty on the place with my camera.

See my arty turn )

From there we proceeded to Wildwood. We chose Wildwood on the grounds that I've been before and Phil has been dying to see the cute British animals they have there for over a year. I took loads of pictures, but lots had to be deleted as they were mostly very good pictures of fences or perspex windows ;) Some of the pictures aren't as clear as I'd like them to be, but they were all taken through fences or windows, so I don't think they're too bad, given the circumstances and my lack of skill :)

All the signs had a badger theme: )

We also found a sign that clearly needed fixing - the 'preferred habitat' and 'favourite food' sections had obviously become switched at some point: )

We saw lots of animals on our travels including (but not limited to):
A red fox. )

Water birds of various types. )

Cranes (at least, I think this is a Crane ;)) )

Sleeping Arctic Foxes. )

Wild horses. )

Various types of Deer. I think this one is Fallow Deer. )

Tawny Owls. )

A sleeping polecat. )

Sleeping Badgers. )

A weasel - at least, I'm fairly sure it's a weasel. Getting a clear picture of it was extremely difficult. It's extremely fast and agile. )

Brief comedy interlude:
What's the difference between a Stoat and a Weasel?
I'm so funny )

A sleeping Lynx. )

Wolves. These were also difficult to get pictures of. I never realised how quick they were before - they all came out slightly blurry. )

Sheep. )

And Black Rats. I'm rather pleased with this picture, which was a complete fluke. )

Of course, there were lots of other animals we saw, but those are my best pictures. For the rest, see here.

Here you see the Philip Overal ('reddus pillus') in his natural habitat. )

Also on a swing... )

...and a mini-zipwire. )

We got told off shortly after that picture was taken by an eight year old who told us that the playground was only for children. We couldn't find any signs to say so though, so I have a clear conscience :). I also had a go on the zipwire. T'was good fun, even if my first go was with my eyes shut and I wouldn't let Phil give me a push off ;)

This is always good advice: )

Some camera and lens porn (SFW - not actual porn) for camera geeks: )

Philip and Little Bunny Foo-Foo pose for a picture: )

It turned out that he had worn his dressing gown to Wildwood. Arthur Dent's influence on his childhood and later life can not be overstated. )

We had lunch at The Parrot (the pub formerly known as Simple Simon's). Pictures here. Food was lovely :)

Finally we explored the River Stour a little.

It was a beautiful spring day, with the sky reflecting in the river. )

Spring is truly springing: )

Some cool throwbacks to the time when there was a mill on this particular section of the river: )

Phil got very close to the river in search of pictures. Unfortunately he didn't fall in. That might have been funny. )

It was a really nice day :)

Asda.
Wildwood.
The Parrot.
The River Stour.
Phil's pictures of the day.
lizziec: (potterpuffs - Tonks)
One for the Chalet Fans (posted last night).

I finally managed to sleep, and when I woke up my camera was charged, so with [livejournal.com profile] benc's help, I photographed the cover again, properly, in decent light (so ridding the pictures of that yellow fuzzy hue).

Here's the decent version:


(There's also a huge version)

Here's the cover, free of annotations:


---

Spent today doing the above, shopping and seeing my in-laws. I can tell you are all awe-inspired by the excitingness of my life right now ;)

lizziec: (potterpuffs - Tonks)
One for the Chalet Fans (posted last night).

I finally managed to sleep, and when I woke up my camera was charged, so with [livejournal.com profile] benc's help, I photographed the cover again, properly, in decent light (so ridding the pictures of that yellow fuzzy hue).

Here's the decent version:


(There's also a huge version)

Here's the cover, free of annotations:


---

Spent today doing the above, shopping and seeing my in-laws. I can tell you are all awe-inspired by the excitingness of my life right now ;)

lizziec: (potterpuffs - Tonks)
One for the Chalet Fans (posted last night).

I finally managed to sleep, and when I woke up my camera was charged, so with [livejournal.com profile] benc's help, I photographed the cover again, properly, in decent light (so ridding the pictures of that yellow fuzzy hue).

Here's the decent version:


(There's also a huge version)

Here's the cover, free of annotations:


---

Spent today doing the above, shopping and seeing my in-laws. I can tell you are all awe-inspired by the excitingness of my life right now ;)
lizziec: (Chalet School)
I couldn't sleep, so I made this:



Sorry about the picture quality, I took it with my camera phone cos I went to use my proper camera and found that the battery was flat (now on charge) and I was too impatient to wait for it to be ready. I'm very pleased with myself for working out how to stick them all together in Paint Shop though :)

Might make a better quality one if I can be bothered.

Picture is of the cover of my GGB copy of The Chalet School Reunion. It has been annotated according to the key on the last page of that edition.
lizziec: (Chalet School)
I couldn't sleep, so I made this:



Sorry about the picture quality, I took it with my camera phone cos I went to use my proper camera and found that the battery was flat (now on charge) and I was too impatient to wait for it to be ready. I'm very pleased with myself for working out how to stick them all together in Paint Shop though :)

Might make a better quality one if I can be bothered.

Picture is of the cover of my GGB copy of The Chalet School Reunion. It has been annotated according to the key on the last page of that edition.
lizziec: (Chalet School)
I couldn't sleep, so I made this:



Sorry about the picture quality, I took it with my camera phone cos I went to use my proper camera and found that the battery was flat (now on charge) and I was too impatient to wait for it to be ready. I'm very pleased with myself for working out how to stick them all together in Paint Shop though :)

Might make a better quality one if I can be bothered.

Picture is of the cover of my GGB copy of The Chalet School Reunion. It has been annotated according to the key on the last page of that edition.
lizziec: (apod - lightening-moon)
I've recently been reading my brand new copy of When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit (my old one, that I had had since I was 8 or so, fell apart from being read rather a lot). I got my new copy through the [livejournal.com profile] lj_uk Christmas Wishlist exchange - it's this edition (2008). According to Barnes and Noble (and various other sites) this book is recommended for 8-12 year olds. I'd agree with that, seems like a good age to read it for the first time.

My edition has a foreword called "Why You'll Love This Book" by Michael Morpurgo, Children's Laureate from 2003-2005. Bear in mind, when reading what comes next that this book is recommended for ages 8-12. His style in writing the foreword suggests that he is talking to these young readers.

The fifth paragraph starts:
"When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, published forty years ago, speaks to us of a time most of us know only through books of history and fiction, through archive film, as well as through movies. It is from The Diary of Anne Frank to I am David and Schindler's List and The Pianist that most of us have our haunting but distant insights into the lives of those who had experienced the terrors and horrors of Nazi persecution and extermination..."

I understand that 8-12 year olds may well have read the former two (The Diary of Anne Frank and I am David) - I know I had read at least one of those at that age (Anne Frank), having both a taste for the historical and something of a fascination with all things WWII (and Holocaust - I think I was a rather odd child). However, I highly doubt they have seen the latter (Schindler's List and The Pianist), not least because they're both rated 15. Don't get me wrong, they're both right up there as favourite films, I think they're amazing. But they're definitely not for children of the age the book is primarily aimed at.

I dunno. That part of the foreword just felt rather odd. Surely, given the writer's status as a former Children's Laureate, he would be aware of what a child of that age has been exposed to, and what they haven't?

lizziec: (apod - lightening-moon)
I've recently been reading my brand new copy of When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit (my old one, that I had had since I was 8 or so, fell apart from being read rather a lot). I got my new copy through the [livejournal.com profile] lj_uk Christmas Wishlist exchange - it's this edition (2008). According to Barnes and Noble (and various other sites) this book is recommended for 8-12 year olds. I'd agree with that, seems like a good age to read it for the first time.

My edition has a foreword called "Why You'll Love This Book" by Michael Morpurgo, Children's Laureate from 2003-2005. Bear in mind, when reading what comes next that this book is recommended for ages 8-12. His style in writing the foreword suggests that he is talking to these young readers.

The fifth paragraph starts:
"When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, published forty years ago, speaks to us of a time most of us know only through books of history and fiction, through archive film, as well as through movies. It is from The Diary of Anne Frank to I am David and Schindler's List and The Pianist that most of us have our haunting but distant insights into the lives of those who had experienced the terrors and horrors of Nazi persecution and extermination..."

I understand that 8-12 year olds may well have read the former two (The Diary of Anne Frank and I am David) - I know I had read at least one of those at that age (Anne Frank), having both a taste for the historical and something of a fascination with all things WWII (and Holocaust - I think I was a rather odd child). However, I highly doubt they have seen the latter (Schindler's List and The Pianist), not least because they're both rated 15. Don't get me wrong, they're both right up there as favourite films, I think they're amazing. But they're definitely not for children of the age the book is primarily aimed at.

I dunno. That part of the foreword just felt rather odd. Surely, given the writer's status as a former Children's Laureate, he would be aware of what a child of that age has been exposed to, and what they haven't?

lizziec: (apod - lightening-moon)
I've recently been reading my brand new copy of When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit (my old one, that I had had since I was 8 or so, fell apart from being read rather a lot). I got my new copy through the [livejournal.com profile] lj_uk Christmas Wishlist exchange - it's this edition (2008). According to Barnes and Noble (and various other sites) this book is recommended for 8-12 year olds. I'd agree with that, seems like a good age to read it for the first time.

My edition has a foreword called "Why You'll Love This Book" by Michael Morpurgo, Children's Laureate from 2003-2005. Bear in mind, when reading what comes next that this book is recommended for ages 8-12. His style in writing the foreword suggests that he is talking to these young readers.

The fifth paragraph starts:
"When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, published forty years ago, speaks to us of a time most of us know only through books of history and fiction, through archive film, as well as through movies. It is from The Diary of Anne Frank to I am David and Schindler's List and The Pianist that most of us have our haunting but distant insights into the lives of those who had experienced the terrors and horrors of Nazi persecution and extermination..."

I understand that 8-12 year olds may well have read the former two (The Diary of Anne Frank and I am David) - I know I had read at least one of those at that age (Anne Frank), having both a taste for the historical and something of a fascination with all things WWII (and Holocaust - I think I was a rather odd child). However, I highly doubt they have seen the latter (Schindler's List and The Pianist), not least because they're both rated 15. Don't get me wrong, they're both right up there as favourite films, I think they're amazing. But they're definitely not for children of the age the book is primarily aimed at.

I dunno. That part of the foreword just felt rather odd. Surely, given the writer's status as a former Children's Laureate, he would be aware of what a child of that age has been exposed to, and what they haven't?
lizziec: (me - mummy and little lizzie)
I'm heading to Goole (not to be confused with Google which is what I nearly always type by accident >.<) in Yorkshire very shortly with [livejournal.com profile] no1typo for a few days to visit relatives. I probably shan't be online, but I'll be contactable on my mobile (see the contact details post for my number [friendslocked]). I shall also probably be tweeting. This is me on Twitter.

Have a lovely few days people :) Write lots of interesting things for me to read when I get back!
lizziec: (me - mummy and little lizzie)
I'm heading to Goole (not to be confused with Google which is what I nearly always type by accident >.<) in Yorkshire very shortly with [livejournal.com profile] no1typo for a few days to visit relatives. I probably shan't be online, but I'll be contactable on my mobile (see the contact details post for my number [friendslocked]). I shall also probably be tweeting. This is me on Twitter.

Have a lovely few days people :) Write lots of interesting things for me to read when I get back!
lizziec: (me - mummy and little lizzie)
I'm heading to Goole (not to be confused with Google which is what I nearly always type by accident >.<) in Yorkshire very shortly with [livejournal.com profile] no1typo for a few days to visit relatives. I probably shan't be online, but I'll be contactable on my mobile (see the contact details post for my number [friendslocked]). I shall also probably be tweeting. This is me on Twitter.

Have a lovely few days people :) Write lots of interesting things for me to read when I get back!
lizziec: (obama britain)
This is pretty cool - it's a bullet pointed list of all the things Obama has done in his first 100 hours of being President. Makes very interesting reading.
lizziec: (obama britain)
This is pretty cool - it's a bullet pointed list of all the things Obama has done in his first 100 hours of being President. Makes very interesting reading.
lizziec: (obama britain)
This is pretty cool - it's a bullet pointed list of all the things Obama has done in his first 100 hours of being President. Makes very interesting reading.
lizziec: (Big ben fireworks new year)
Typical, that on the day the Government withdraws the plan to keep MPs expenses secret my MP should write back to me about voting against the proposed measure.

For good measure, I'm putting a copy of his reply here. Bits in italics were handwritten and not always very clear ;)

Letter from Julian Brazier )

In other news, should you have any spare cash lying around (I know that this is unlikely given the current economic climate) and fancy putting it towards a cool cause, the National Railway Museum in York are trying to gather funds so they can finish their restoration of The Flying Scotsman. "Steam our Scotsman" - the campaign to raise money to finish the restoration.
lizziec: (Big ben fireworks new year)
Typical, that on the day the Government withdraws the plan to keep MPs expenses secret my MP should write back to me about voting against the proposed measure.

For good measure, I'm putting a copy of his reply here. Bits in italics were handwritten and not always very clear ;)

Letter from Julian Brazier )

In other news, should you have any spare cash lying around (I know that this is unlikely given the current economic climate) and fancy putting it towards a cool cause, the National Railway Museum in York are trying to gather funds so they can finish their restoration of The Flying Scotsman. "Steam our Scotsman" - the campaign to raise money to finish the restoration.
lizziec: (Big ben fireworks new year)
Typical, that on the day the Government withdraws the plan to keep MPs expenses secret my MP should write back to me about voting against the proposed measure.

For good measure, I'm putting a copy of his reply here. Bits in italics were handwritten and not always very clear ;)

Letter from Julian Brazier )

In other news, should you have any spare cash lying around (I know that this is unlikely given the current economic climate) and fancy putting it towards a cool cause, the National Railway Museum in York are trying to gather funds so they can finish their restoration of The Flying Scotsman. "Steam our Scotsman" - the campaign to raise money to finish the restoration.
lizziec: (Wallace and Gromit - Gromit studying)
Jumping on the bandwagon. First sentence of first post of each month of the year. It was [livejournal.com profile] mrs_redboots who tipped me over the edge.

January: Ever since Portal came out in Mid October last year, my husband [livejournal.com profile] benc has been more or less obsessed with Moist Delicious Cake and The Weighted Companion Cube which are both "components" of the game.

February: Last night I saw the most recent Wulffmorgenthaler and it amused me.

March: In other news, I've been very busy this week, doing something every day (including seeing [livejournal.com profile] bethanthepurple twice! hello bethan!).

April: Niamh: Better than last week, pity that she seemed constantly struggling against the band for volume.

May: Jodie: Seemed lucky with the song choice - I seem to think of it as a musical theatre song more than a big band song.

June: I'm curious about my f-list's opinions on this because I don't really know where I stand.

July: Today the NHS turns 60, and I want to wish it a very happy birthday and wish it well for the next 60.

August: I went with [livejournal.com profile] no1typo today to Greenwich to have a wander around the market and we had a lovely time.

September: [livejournal.com profile] benc has just come to a startling conclusion that I feel must be shared with the world.

October: For those of you who are interested in going to the Tyler Hill bonfire and fireworks, they are on Saturday 1st November this year.

November: Firstly I feel I should mention the US election.

December: A link for those of you who are in to Battlestar Galactica (I think it's spoiler free).

Finally, a very happy New Year to you all! :D


Picture courtesy of [livejournal.com profile] benc
lizziec: (carebare hug)
I've been pretty wound up about Proposition 8 (with good reason), but I felt we could do with a lighthearted but pointed interlude to giggle over for a bit :)

And so, without further ado, I present:

Proposition 8, The Musical starring Jack Black, John C. Reilly, and many more...



From various sources, but the one that actually prompted me to watch to and then post was Boing Boing.

Cross posted to [livejournal.com profile] exmormon

lizziec: (carebare hug)
I've been pretty wound up about Proposition 8 (with good reason), but I felt we could do with a lighthearted but pointed interlude to giggle over for a bit :)

And so, without further ado, I present:

Proposition 8, The Musical starring Jack Black, John C. Reilly, and many more...



From various sources, but the one that actually prompted me to watch to and then post was Boing Boing.

Cross posted to [livejournal.com profile] exmormon

lizziec: (carebare hug)
I've been pretty wound up about Proposition 8 (with good reason), but I felt we could do with a lighthearted but pointed interlude to giggle over for a bit :)

And so, without further ado, I present:

Proposition 8, The Musical starring Jack Black, John C. Reilly, and many more...



From various sources, but the one that actually prompted me to watch to and then post was Boing Boing.

Cross posted to [livejournal.com profile] exmormon
lizziec: (Robin Hood (Errol Flynn))
For those of you who like taking off ladies bras:



From here
lizziec: (Robin Hood (Errol Flynn))
For those of you who like taking off ladies bras:



From here
lizziec: (Robin Hood (Errol Flynn))
For those of you who like taking off ladies bras:



From here
lizziec: (frog)
A link for those of you who are in to Battlestar Galactica (I think it's spoiler free).
lizziec: (frog)
A link for those of you who are in to Battlestar Galactica (I think it's spoiler free).
lizziec: (frog)
A link for those of you who are in to Battlestar Galactica (I think it's spoiler free).
lizziec: (animals - gerbil - nibbler)
I went with [livejournal.com profile] no1typo today to Greenwich to have a wander around the market and we had a lovely time. We both arrived early because we did not want to be late, and had a starbucks with a pastry which was excellent (in my rush to be not late, I skipped breakfast), after which we went for a wander through the market. We saw many excellent and lovely things and I wish I could afford or have space for half of them. In the end I came home with a pair of earrings and two pairs of socks, which are just awesome:




The giraffe ones are my absolute favourites.

In the course of our wanderings we saw this shop with its retro 80s sign, had a peek at how the Cutty Sark was doing, saw low flying RAF rescue helicopter which landed near the Dome (I hope noone was hurt) and had a ride on the amusingly named "Wheel of Excellence" (here). The view was spectacular. It's there till some time in September, so if you're in the area I can recommend a trip on it. It's only £7 for an adult and I think good value for what you get :) It's no London Eye, but it doesn't really pretend to be in size, legnth of ride or price :)

All pictures here. Sorry for the quality - I didn't take my lovely Panasonic to Greenwich with me, so took them with my phone's camera.
lizziec: (Rocks fall)
I finally got round to photographing and uploading more pictures from "From Vision to Reality", as well as rephotographing those that were already there so they are better quality. They are here for those who want to look :) I've also made a new LJ icon.

ION: I went to see The Dark Knight this evening at Ashford. Twas good. Won't say any more though in case of spoilers.

lizziec: (Rocks fall)
I finally got round to photographing and uploading more pictures from "From Vision to Reality", as well as rephotographing those that were already there so they are better quality. They are here for those who want to look :) I've also made a new LJ icon.

ION: I went to see The Dark Knight this evening at Ashford. Twas good. Won't say any more though in case of spoilers.

lizziec: (Rocks fall)
I finally got round to photographing and uploading more pictures from "From Vision to Reality", as well as rephotographing those that were already there so they are better quality. They are here for those who want to look :) I've also made a new LJ icon.

ION: I went to see The Dark Knight this evening at Ashford. Twas good. Won't say any more though in case of spoilers.
lizziec: (animals - gerbil - stan)
In light of the discussion on IRC earlier about DRM which led to downloading stuff, and the potential "three strike" rule (see this and this to see what sparked the discussion), I thought the following might be interesting for several people. I participate in the YouGov daily "select" surveys, and the day after they send out the results so you can see what other people think. These are the results from Friday's survey (questions above the results) - they seemed relevant.

Six of the UK's biggest net providers have agreed a plan with the music industry to tackle piracy online. To what extent do you approve or oppose the following action?

Music piracy should be made illegal
Strongly approve 24.4%
Approve somewhat 27.1%
Disapprove somewhat 14%
Strongly disapprove 13%
Neither approve nor disapprove 18.1%

Internet providers should enforce a 'three strike' rule.
Strongly approve 25.9%
Approve somewhat 26.5%
Disapprove somewhat 12.3%
Strongly disapprove 21.3%
Neither approve nor disapprove 10.8%

Online users should be subject to an annual levy to cover losses from file-sharing
Strongly approve 7.3%
Approve somewhat 12.8%
Disapprove somewhat 13%
Strongly disapprove 52.7%
Neither approve nor disapprove 8.7%
lizziec: (acid)
Today the NHS turns 60, and I want to wish it a very happy birthday and wish it well for the next 60. I know there are plenty of problems with it, I am not blinkered enough to say that there could not be improvements, but I believe that it is one of the greatest achievements of this country, especially in the post-World War II period. Here's why.

In 1900 (that's only 108 years ago) in this country:
* Life expectancy was below 50 years
* 163 out of every 1000 babies born died before they reached the age of 1 (that's 16.3%)
* The majority of families could not afford to see a doctor

The government refused to interfere as the emphasis at this point in time was on a "laissez-faire" country, meaning that things should be left to take their own course. It was believed that interference by the Government would strangle the economy, so generally people were left to sink or swim as they could. During the latter years of the 19th Century, and the early years of the 20th Century many reports began to come out which drew attention to the plight of the poor, which was reinforced by something of a recruitment crisis for the army during the Boer War. Of those who volunteered 35% (over a third) were rejected as medically unfit, generally because of problems related to poverty.

This changed in 1906 when the Liberal Party was elected, with David Lloyd George as their Chancellor of the Exchequor, and what followed was a package of reforms that ultimately led to a constitutional crisis. The reforms included the setting up of Old Age Pensions, free school meals (which went quite some way to tackling malnutrition among the poor), slum clearance programmes and Labour Exchanges (see here for more information).

The most pertinent reform to what I'm discussing today was the 1911 National Health Insurance act, which brought in various safeguards for those in employment who could afford to contribute to a scheme, which would then pay for them to go see a doctor if ill, and pay a small sum every week if the contributor were unemployed or unable to work. The government paid a sum to the scheme, as did the employer. The limitations of this scheme were numerous. It only covered those able to work, which at this period were mostly men, and even then the only hospitalisation it payed for was sanitorium treatment for TB. It did not cover those earning too little to be able to afford to contribute, children, the elderly, women, and those who were chronically and mentally ill. As a result, many still relied on the quack remedies that they had done before the scheme came in to force. The sad truth was that despite the advances in Medicine that had taken place, most people could not access it. The major problems with NHI showed themselves in the 1930s during the Great Depression when so many were out of work, and so many accounts in arrears (upwards of 4 million) that the companies running the schemes made no profit, which was compounded when the government reduced its contribution.

The turning point came with the Second World War. The Government were in possession of some rather terrifying figures about expected casualty rates as a result of any enemy bombing action, which thankfully never came to pass, though the Government did not know this at the start of the war. Expected Casualties (because I found this during my dissertation research and I think it's really interesting) ) As a result the Government planned various strategies to deal with the expected casualties (including a stockpile of cardboard coffins). The one relevant to this "History of the NHS", is the Emergency Hospital Scheme, which was funded and run by the Government and was "designed to serve the purpose of a moment" - to look after those injured in the war, especially bombing victims. Under this scheme any treatment needed, including hospitalisation, was free. It was during this period, in 1942, the the Beveridge Report was published which proposed a "free national health service" as a way of combating the five 'Giant Evils' of Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness. The Conservatives, who nominally had the majority in the Commons at this time (though there was actually a "Government of National Unity" in power) refused to commit to putting in place the reforms, which was one of the reasons why they were beaten so comprehensively by the Labour party in the 1945 General Election. One of their first acts when they got in to power was the 1946 National Health Service Act, which provided in law for a free and comprehensive health care system.

The first day of this National Health Service was to be 5th July 1948 but there was an enormous amount of work that had to take place before it could start, including the nationalisation of Hospitals, the creation of health centres, the better/fairer distribution of doctors around the country and the creation of a new salary structure. On top of all this work, there was a huge amount of opposition (as with any large and sudden change). Most Local Authorities and Charitable Organisations who had previously run hospitals were opposed, as were doctors, who did not want to be employed by the government, or told where to work. In fact, at the beginning of 1948 90% of doctors said that they would not co-operate with the NHS. There was also opposition from many who were scared by the huge costs involved, but Aneurin Bevan who was Minister for Health at this time argued that Britain could afford it, and had to afford it. Bevan worked extremely hard to ensure the creation of the NHS, and by hook or by crook (he allowed doctors to work for the NHS and keep private patients while getting the public to sign up with doctors for the NHS - if a doctor didn't sign the form, he risked losing the patient [and the funding that came with them] to a doctor who would), made sure that over 90% of doctors had signed up by the opening day.

The benefits of the NHS were visible very quickly, especially in those groups which had not been covered until its creation. Maternal and infant mortality levels fell very quickly and life expectancy rose, especially as the new techniques and drugs (such as Penicillin) became available at no cost to people who would have died for want of them.

In 2008 we're looking at:
* An average life expectancy of 77 years, with more and more living until 100.
* An average of 5.2 out of every 1000 babies dying before the age of 1 (0.52%) [figures from 2006]
* Everyone can see a doctor, irrespective of whether they can pay

What I'm trying to say in an incredibly long winded way is that the NHS may not be perfect, but in comparison to what we have had before it is amazing, and I sometimes think we lose sight of just how brilliant it is amongst all the complaining about the things that are wrong and the compromises that sometimes have to be made.

My dad was chronically ill with Type 1 Diabetes most of his life, and we did not have to pay towards his care. His final illness and the two weeks spent in intensive care did not bankrupt us. My sister was born 15 weeks prematurely and spent her 16 hours of life receiving the best care available in 1982, and my parents were not left with a crippling bill as well as a dead daughter. When my mum hurt her back and she was in bed for 6 weeks her care (a physio, home help twice a day, doctors visits, nurse visits) did not cost us. When my mum was pregnant with me and was kept in hospital for most of those 9 months my parents did not have to check her out because they were worried about the cost, nor did they have to worry about the bill they were getting at the end. When I was ill with depression I did not have to worry about the cost of my prescriptions or my counselling. The times Phil has injured himself we have not had to worry about the bill from the Hospital for getting him checked out. Ben and I have not had to worry that while I've been off work I've been without coverage for my health (or traded electricity/food/rent for insurance coverage).

I think there's a lot to be said for that. So Happy Birthday NHS, here's to many many more.

ETA: Pretty much 1500 words. I wrote as much as that in some of my degree essays. Sorry guys!

ETA2 (2011): Since I wrote this my mum died from a rare form of Cancer. Her care was second to none and nothing was denied her on grounds of cost. We were not left with crippling bills, and not having to worry about finding money for her care made her last weeks and days easier for everyone.

lizziec: (apod - Venus)
I got this from [livejournal.com profile] jmkg, and she explains it best, so I'll let her:

"Please sign the petition at http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/flexibleleave/ which was set up this week. The current system of new parent's leave in the UK is very unbalanced, where the mother can take 52 weeks off (13 unpaid) but her partner can only have 2 weeks off at a low rate of pay. We believe that this needs to be changed.

We believe that families should be able to choose what works for them, rather than assuming that the mother will always be the parent who will be taking the childcare leave. In a lot of situations the mother may wish not to have a full year off work, or the family may not be able to afford for her to. Yet there is no provision to transfer any leave to the mother's partner, who equally may well prefer to have more than the two weeks allocated to spend with their new baby. Naturally a lot of families would still choose the traditional route of the mother taking the full leave, but *there should be the choice*. Please sign the petition even if you don't think it affects you personally, but you think that other families should be able to choose what's right for their situation.

A flexible system of leave could also have the advantage of reducing sexist employment behaviours. MEP Godfrey Bloom (UKIP) said "No self-respecting small businessman with a brain in the right place would ever employ a lady of child-bearing age", but if parental leave wasn't automatically assigned to the mother then a major incentive for unscrupulous businesses *not* to hire women of child-bearing age would disappear.

The petition doesn't propose any increase in the overall amount of leave allowed to new parents, though that could be a focus for future campaigns. It is just intended as a first step - a large first step, which could make the world a fairer place without costing money for businesses (a major reason why other proposals to make the leave allowances fairer have failed).

What you can do: please sign the petition, and visit our website at equalrights.org.uk for more information. Please pass this message onto other people: tell your friends, tell your online communities, get people interested, help spread the word!
"
lizziec: (apod - Venus)
I got this from [livejournal.com profile] jmkg, and she explains it best, so I'll let her:

"Please sign the petition at http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/flexibleleave/ which was set up this week. The current system of new parent's leave in the UK is very unbalanced, where the mother can take 52 weeks off (13 unpaid) but her partner can only have 2 weeks off at a low rate of pay. We believe that this needs to be changed.

We believe that families should be able to choose what works for them, rather than assuming that the mother will always be the parent who will be taking the childcare leave. In a lot of situations the mother may wish not to have a full year off work, or the family may not be able to afford for her to. Yet there is no provision to transfer any leave to the mother's partner, who equally may well prefer to have more than the two weeks allocated to spend with their new baby. Naturally a lot of families would still choose the traditional route of the mother taking the full leave, but *there should be the choice*. Please sign the petition even if you don't think it affects you personally, but you think that other families should be able to choose what's right for their situation.

A flexible system of leave could also have the advantage of reducing sexist employment behaviours. MEP Godfrey Bloom (UKIP) said "No self-respecting small businessman with a brain in the right place would ever employ a lady of child-bearing age", but if parental leave wasn't automatically assigned to the mother then a major incentive for unscrupulous businesses *not* to hire women of child-bearing age would disappear.

The petition doesn't propose any increase in the overall amount of leave allowed to new parents, though that could be a focus for future campaigns. It is just intended as a first step - a large first step, which could make the world a fairer place without costing money for businesses (a major reason why other proposals to make the leave allowances fairer have failed).

What you can do: please sign the petition, and visit our website at equalrights.org.uk for more information. Please pass this message onto other people: tell your friends, tell your online communities, get people interested, help spread the word!
"
lizziec: (apod - Venus)
I got this from [livejournal.com profile] jmkg, and she explains it best, so I'll let her:

"Please sign the petition at http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/flexibleleave/ which was set up this week. The current system of new parent's leave in the UK is very unbalanced, where the mother can take 52 weeks off (13 unpaid) but her partner can only have 2 weeks off at a low rate of pay. We believe that this needs to be changed.

We believe that families should be able to choose what works for them, rather than assuming that the mother will always be the parent who will be taking the childcare leave. In a lot of situations the mother may wish not to have a full year off work, or the family may not be able to afford for her to. Yet there is no provision to transfer any leave to the mother's partner, who equally may well prefer to have more than the two weeks allocated to spend with their new baby. Naturally a lot of families would still choose the traditional route of the mother taking the full leave, but *there should be the choice*. Please sign the petition even if you don't think it affects you personally, but you think that other families should be able to choose what's right for their situation.

A flexible system of leave could also have the advantage of reducing sexist employment behaviours. MEP Godfrey Bloom (UKIP) said "No self-respecting small businessman with a brain in the right place would ever employ a lady of child-bearing age", but if parental leave wasn't automatically assigned to the mother then a major incentive for unscrupulous businesses *not* to hire women of child-bearing age would disappear.

The petition doesn't propose any increase in the overall amount of leave allowed to new parents, though that could be a focus for future campaigns. It is just intended as a first step - a large first step, which could make the world a fairer place without costing money for businesses (a major reason why other proposals to make the leave allowances fairer have failed).

What you can do: please sign the petition, and visit our website at equalrights.org.uk for more information. Please pass this message onto other people: tell your friends, tell your online communities, get people interested, help spread the word!
"
lizziec: (carebear star)
I found this link earlier: "He Took A Polaroid Every Day Until The Day He Died".

"Yesterday I came across a slightly mysterious website — a collection of Polaroids, one per day, from March 31, 1979 through October 25, 1997. There’s no author listed, no contact info, and no other indication as to where these came from. So, naturally, I started looking through the photos. I was stunned by what I found."

Go look - it's well worth it.

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