lizziec: (acid)
Today the NHS turns 60, and I want to wish it a very happy birthday and wish it well for the next 60. I know there are plenty of problems with it, I am not blinkered enough to say that there could not be improvements, but I believe that it is one of the greatest achievements of this country, especially in the post-World War II period. Here's why.

In 1900 (that's only 108 years ago) in this country:
* Life expectancy was below 50 years
* 163 out of every 1000 babies born died before they reached the age of 1 (that's 16.3%)
* The majority of families could not afford to see a doctor

The government refused to interfere as the emphasis at this point in time was on a "laissez-faire" country, meaning that things should be left to take their own course. It was believed that interference by the Government would strangle the economy, so generally people were left to sink or swim as they could. During the latter years of the 19th Century, and the early years of the 20th Century many reports began to come out which drew attention to the plight of the poor, which was reinforced by something of a recruitment crisis for the army during the Boer War. Of those who volunteered 35% (over a third) were rejected as medically unfit, generally because of problems related to poverty.

This changed in 1906 when the Liberal Party was elected, with David Lloyd George as their Chancellor of the Exchequor, and what followed was a package of reforms that ultimately led to a constitutional crisis. The reforms included the setting up of Old Age Pensions, free school meals (which went quite some way to tackling malnutrition among the poor), slum clearance programmes and Labour Exchanges (see here for more information).

The most pertinent reform to what I'm discussing today was the 1911 National Health Insurance act, which brought in various safeguards for those in employment who could afford to contribute to a scheme, which would then pay for them to go see a doctor if ill, and pay a small sum every week if the contributor were unemployed or unable to work. The government paid a sum to the scheme, as did the employer. The limitations of this scheme were numerous. It only covered those able to work, which at this period were mostly men, and even then the only hospitalisation it payed for was sanitorium treatment for TB. It did not cover those earning too little to be able to afford to contribute, children, the elderly, women, and those who were chronically and mentally ill. As a result, many still relied on the quack remedies that they had done before the scheme came in to force. The sad truth was that despite the advances in Medicine that had taken place, most people could not access it. The major problems with NHI showed themselves in the 1930s during the Great Depression when so many were out of work, and so many accounts in arrears (upwards of 4 million) that the companies running the schemes made no profit, which was compounded when the government reduced its contribution.

The turning point came with the Second World War. The Government were in possession of some rather terrifying figures about expected casualty rates as a result of any enemy bombing action, which thankfully never came to pass, though the Government did not know this at the start of the war. Expected Casualties (because I found this during my dissertation research and I think it's really interesting) ) As a result the Government planned various strategies to deal with the expected casualties (including a stockpile of cardboard coffins). The one relevant to this "History of the NHS", is the Emergency Hospital Scheme, which was funded and run by the Government and was "designed to serve the purpose of a moment" - to look after those injured in the war, especially bombing victims. Under this scheme any treatment needed, including hospitalisation, was free. It was during this period, in 1942, the the Beveridge Report was published which proposed a "free national health service" as a way of combating the five 'Giant Evils' of Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness. The Conservatives, who nominally had the majority in the Commons at this time (though there was actually a "Government of National Unity" in power) refused to commit to putting in place the reforms, which was one of the reasons why they were beaten so comprehensively by the Labour party in the 1945 General Election. One of their first acts when they got in to power was the 1946 National Health Service Act, which provided in law for a free and comprehensive health care system.

The first day of this National Health Service was to be 5th July 1948 but there was an enormous amount of work that had to take place before it could start, including the nationalisation of Hospitals, the creation of health centres, the better/fairer distribution of doctors around the country and the creation of a new salary structure. On top of all this work, there was a huge amount of opposition (as with any large and sudden change). Most Local Authorities and Charitable Organisations who had previously run hospitals were opposed, as were doctors, who did not want to be employed by the government, or told where to work. In fact, at the beginning of 1948 90% of doctors said that they would not co-operate with the NHS. There was also opposition from many who were scared by the huge costs involved, but Aneurin Bevan who was Minister for Health at this time argued that Britain could afford it, and had to afford it. Bevan worked extremely hard to ensure the creation of the NHS, and by hook or by crook (he allowed doctors to work for the NHS and keep private patients while getting the public to sign up with doctors for the NHS - if a doctor didn't sign the form, he risked losing the patient [and the funding that came with them] to a doctor who would), made sure that over 90% of doctors had signed up by the opening day.

The benefits of the NHS were visible very quickly, especially in those groups which had not been covered until its creation. Maternal and infant mortality levels fell very quickly and life expectancy rose, especially as the new techniques and drugs (such as Penicillin) became available at no cost to people who would have died for want of them.

In 2008 we're looking at:
* An average life expectancy of 77 years, with more and more living until 100.
* An average of 5.2 out of every 1000 babies dying before the age of 1 (0.52%) [figures from 2006]
* Everyone can see a doctor, irrespective of whether they can pay

What I'm trying to say in an incredibly long winded way is that the NHS may not be perfect, but in comparison to what we have had before it is amazing, and I sometimes think we lose sight of just how brilliant it is amongst all the complaining about the things that are wrong and the compromises that sometimes have to be made.

My dad was chronically ill with Type 1 Diabetes most of his life, and we did not have to pay towards his care. His final illness and the two weeks spent in intensive care did not bankrupt us. My sister was born 15 weeks prematurely and spent her 16 hours of life receiving the best care available in 1982, and my parents were not left with a crippling bill as well as a dead daughter. When my mum hurt her back and she was in bed for 6 weeks her care (a physio, home help twice a day, doctors visits, nurse visits) did not cost us. When my mum was pregnant with me and was kept in hospital for most of those 9 months my parents did not have to check her out because they were worried about the cost, nor did they have to worry about the bill they were getting at the end. When I was ill with depression I did not have to worry about the cost of my prescriptions or my counselling. The times Phil has injured himself we have not had to worry about the bill from the Hospital for getting him checked out. Ben and I have not had to worry that while I've been off work I've been without coverage for my health (or traded electricity/food/rent for insurance coverage).

I think there's a lot to be said for that. So Happy Birthday NHS, here's to many many more.

ETA: Pretty much 1500 words. I wrote as much as that in some of my degree essays. Sorry guys!

ETA2 (2011): Since I wrote this my mum died from a rare form of Cancer. Her care was second to none and nothing was denied her on grounds of cost. We were not left with crippling bills, and not having to worry about finding money for her care made her last weeks and days easier for everyone.

lizziec: (acid)
Today the NHS turns 60, and I want to wish it a very happy birthday and wish it well for the next 60. I know there are plenty of problems with it, I am not blinkered enough to say that there could not be improvements, but I believe that it is one of the greatest achievements of this country, especially in the post-World War II period. Here's why.

In 1900 (that's only 108 years ago) in this country:
* Life expectancy was below 50 years
* 163 out of every 1000 babies born died before they reached the age of 1 (that's 16.3%)
* The majority of families could not afford to see a doctor

The government refused to interfere as the emphasis at this point in time was on a "laissez-faire" country, meaning that things should be left to take their own course. It was believed that interference by the Government would strangle the economy, so generally people were left to sink or swim as they could. During the latter years of the 19th Century, and the early years of the 20th Century many reports began to come out which drew attention to the plight of the poor, which was reinforced by something of a recruitment crisis for the army during the Boer War. Of those who volunteered 35% (over a third) were rejected as medically unfit, generally because of problems related to poverty.

This changed in 1906 when the Liberal Party was elected, with David Lloyd George as their Chancellor of the Exchequor, and what followed was a package of reforms that ultimately led to a constitutional crisis. The reforms included the setting up of Old Age Pensions, free school meals (which went quite some way to tackling malnutrition among the poor), slum clearance programmes and Labour Exchanges (see here for more information).

The most pertinent reform to what I'm discussing today was the 1911 National Health Insurance act, which brought in various safeguards for those in employment who could afford to contribute to a scheme, which would then pay for them to go see a doctor if ill, and pay a small sum every week if the contributor were unemployed or unable to work. The government paid a sum to the scheme, as did the employer. The limitations of this scheme were numerous. It only covered those able to work, which at this period were mostly men, and even then the only hospitalisation it payed for was sanitorium treatment for TB. It did not cover those earning too little to be able to afford to contribute, children, the elderly, women, and those who were chronically and mentally ill. As a result, many still relied on the quack remedies that they had done before the scheme came in to force. The sad truth was that despite the advances in Medicine that had taken place, most people could not access it. The major problems with NHI showed themselves in the 1930s during the Great Depression when so many were out of work, and so many accounts in arrears (upwards of 4 million) that the companies running the schemes made no profit, which was compounded when the government reduced its contribution.

The turning point came with the Second World War. The Government were in possession of some rather terrifying figures about expected casualty rates as a result of any enemy bombing action, which thankfully never came to pass, though the Government did not know this at the start of the war. Expected Casualties (because I found this during my dissertation research and I think it's really interesting) ) As a result the Government planned various strategies to deal with the expected casualties (including a stockpile of cardboard coffins). The one relevant to this "History of the NHS", is the Emergency Hospital Scheme, which was funded and run by the Government and was "designed to serve the purpose of a moment" - to look after those injured in the war, especially bombing victims. Under this scheme any treatment needed, including hospitalisation, was free. It was during this period, in 1942, the the Beveridge Report was published which proposed a "free national health service" as a way of combating the five 'Giant Evils' of Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness. The Conservatives, who nominally had the majority in the Commons at this time (though there was actually a "Government of National Unity" in power) refused to commit to putting in place the reforms, which was one of the reasons why they were beaten so comprehensively by the Labour party in the 1945 General Election. One of their first acts when they got in to power was the 1946 National Health Service Act, which provided in law for a free and comprehensive health care system.

The first day of this National Health Service was to be 5th July 1948 but there was an enormous amount of work that had to take place before it could start, including the nationalisation of Hospitals, the creation of health centres, the better/fairer distribution of doctors around the country and the creation of a new salary structure. On top of all this work, there was a huge amount of opposition (as with any large and sudden change). Most Local Authorities and Charitable Organisations who had previously run hospitals were opposed, as were doctors, who did not want to be employed by the government, or told where to work. In fact, at the beginning of 1948 90% of doctors said that they would not co-operate with the NHS. There was also opposition from many who were scared by the huge costs involved, but Aneurin Bevan who was Minister for Health at this time argued that Britain could afford it, and had to afford it. Bevan worked extremely hard to ensure the creation of the NHS, and by hook or by crook (he allowed doctors to work for the NHS and keep private patients while getting the public to sign up with doctors for the NHS - if a doctor didn't sign the form, he risked losing the patient [and the funding that came with them] to a doctor who would), made sure that over 90% of doctors had signed up by the opening day.

The benefits of the NHS were visible very quickly, especially in those groups which had not been covered until its creation. Maternal and infant mortality levels fell very quickly and life expectancy rose, especially as the new techniques and drugs (such as Penicillin) became available at no cost to people who would have died for want of them.

In 2008 we're looking at:
* An average life expectancy of 77 years, with more and more living until 100.
* An average of 5.2 out of every 1000 babies dying before the age of 1 (0.52%) [figures from 2006]
* Everyone can see a doctor, irrespective of whether they can pay

What I'm trying to say in an incredibly long winded way is that the NHS may not be perfect, but in comparison to what we have had before it is amazing, and I sometimes think we lose sight of just how brilliant it is amongst all the complaining about the things that are wrong and the compromises that sometimes have to be made.

My dad was chronically ill with Type 1 Diabetes most of his life, and we did not have to pay towards his care. His final illness and the two weeks spent in intensive care did not bankrupt us. My sister was born 15 weeks prematurely and spent her 16 hours of life receiving the best care available in 1982, and my parents were not left with a crippling bill as well as a dead daughter. When my mum hurt her back and she was in bed for 6 weeks her care (a physio, home help twice a day, doctors visits, nurse visits) did not cost us. When my mum was pregnant with me and was kept in hospital for most of those 9 months my parents did not have to check her out because they were worried about the cost, nor did they have to worry about the bill they were getting at the end. When I was ill with depression I did not have to worry about the cost of my prescriptions or my counselling. The times Phil has injured himself we have not had to worry about the bill from the Hospital for getting him checked out. Ben and I have not had to worry that while I've been off work I've been without coverage for my health (or traded electricity/food/rent for insurance coverage).

I think there's a lot to be said for that. So Happy Birthday NHS, here's to many many more.

ETA: Pretty much 1500 words. I wrote as much as that in some of my degree essays. Sorry guys!

ETA2 (2011): Since I wrote this my mum died from a rare form of Cancer. Her care was second to none and nothing was denied her on grounds of cost. We were not left with crippling bills, and not having to worry about finding money for her care made her last weeks and days easier for everyone.

lizziec: (acid)
Today the NHS turns 60, and I want to wish it a very happy birthday and wish it well for the next 60. I know there are plenty of problems with it, I am not blinkered enough to say that there could not be improvements, but I believe that it is one of the greatest achievements of this country, especially in the post-World War II period. Here's why.

In 1900 (that's only 108 years ago) in this country:
* Life expectancy was below 50 years
* 163 out of every 1000 babies born died before they reached the age of 1 (that's 16.3%)
* The majority of families could not afford to see a doctor

The government refused to interfere as the emphasis at this point in time was on a "laissez-faire" country, meaning that things should be left to take their own course. It was believed that interference by the Government would strangle the economy, so generally people were left to sink or swim as they could. During the latter years of the 19th Century, and the early years of the 20th Century many reports began to come out which drew attention to the plight of the poor, which was reinforced by something of a recruitment crisis for the army during the Boer War. Of those who volunteered 35% (over a third) were rejected as medically unfit, generally because of problems related to poverty.

This changed in 1906 when the Liberal Party was elected, with David Lloyd George as their Chancellor of the Exchequor, and what followed was a package of reforms that ultimately led to a constitutional crisis. The reforms included the setting up of Old Age Pensions, free school meals (which went quite some way to tackling malnutrition among the poor), slum clearance programmes and Labour Exchanges (see here for more information).

The most pertinent reform to what I'm discussing today was the 1911 National Health Insurance act, which brought in various safeguards for those in employment who could afford to contribute to a scheme, which would then pay for them to go see a doctor if ill, and pay a small sum every week if the contributor were unemployed or unable to work. The government paid a sum to the scheme, as did the employer. The limitations of this scheme were numerous. It only covered those able to work, which at this period were mostly men, and even then the only hospitalisation it payed for was sanitorium treatment for TB. It did not cover those earning too little to be able to afford to contribute, children, the elderly, women, and those who were chronically and mentally ill. As a result, many still relied on the quack remedies that they had done before the scheme came in to force. The sad truth was that despite the advances in Medicine that had taken place, most people could not access it. The major problems with NHI showed themselves in the 1930s during the Great Depression when so many were out of work, and so many accounts in arrears (upwards of 4 million) that the companies running the schemes made no profit, which was compounded when the government reduced its contribution.

The turning point came with the Second World War. The Government were in possession of some rather terrifying figures about expected casualty rates as a result of any enemy bombing action, which thankfully never came to pass, though the Government did not know this at the start of the war. Expected Casualties (because I found this during my dissertation research and I think it's really interesting) ) As a result the Government planned various strategies to deal with the expected casualties (including a stockpile of cardboard coffins). The one relevant to this "History of the NHS", is the Emergency Hospital Scheme, which was funded and run by the Government and was "designed to serve the purpose of a moment" - to look after those injured in the war, especially bombing victims. Under this scheme any treatment needed, including hospitalisation, was free. It was during this period, in 1942, the the Beveridge Report was published which proposed a "free national health service" as a way of combating the five 'Giant Evils' of Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness. The Conservatives, who nominally had the majority in the Commons at this time (though there was actually a "Government of National Unity" in power) refused to commit to putting in place the reforms, which was one of the reasons why they were beaten so comprehensively by the Labour party in the 1945 General Election. One of their first acts when they got in to power was the 1946 National Health Service Act, which provided in law for a free and comprehensive health care system.

The first day of this National Health Service was to be 5th July 1948 but there was an enormous amount of work that had to take place before it could start, including the nationalisation of Hospitals, the creation of health centres, the better/fairer distribution of doctors around the country and the creation of a new salary structure. On top of all this work, there was a huge amount of opposition (as with any large and sudden change). Most Local Authorities and Charitable Organisations who had previously run hospitals were opposed, as were doctors, who did not want to be employed by the government, or told where to work. In fact, at the beginning of 1948 90% of doctors said that they would not co-operate with the NHS. There was also opposition from many who were scared by the huge costs involved, but Aneurin Bevan who was Minister for Health at this time argued that Britain could afford it, and had to afford it. Bevan worked extremely hard to ensure the creation of the NHS, and by hook or by crook (he allowed doctors to work for the NHS and keep private patients while getting the public to sign up with doctors for the NHS - if a doctor didn't sign the form, he risked losing the patient [and the funding that came with them] to a doctor who would), made sure that over 90% of doctors had signed up by the opening day.

The benefits of the NHS were visible very quickly, especially in those groups which had not been covered until its creation. Maternal and infant mortality levels fell very quickly and life expectancy rose, especially as the new techniques and drugs (such as Penicillin) became available at no cost to people who would have died for want of them.

In 2008 we're looking at:
* An average life expectancy of 77 years, with more and more living until 100.
* An average of 5.2 out of every 1000 babies dying before the age of 1 (0.52%) [figures from 2006]
* Everyone can see a doctor, irrespective of whether they can pay

What I'm trying to say in an incredibly long winded way is that the NHS may not be perfect, but in comparison to what we have had before it is amazing, and I sometimes think we lose sight of just how brilliant it is amongst all the complaining about the things that are wrong and the compromises that sometimes have to be made.

My dad was chronically ill with Type 1 Diabetes most of his life, and we did not have to pay towards his care. His final illness and the two weeks spent in intensive care did not bankrupt us. My sister was born 15 weeks prematurely and spent her 16 hours of life receiving the best care available in 1982, and my parents were not left with a crippling bill as well as a dead daughter. When my mum hurt her back and she was in bed for 6 weeks her care (a physio, home help twice a day, doctors visits, nurse visits) did not cost us. When my mum was pregnant with me and was kept in hospital for most of those 9 months my parents did not have to check her out because they were worried about the cost, nor did they have to worry about the bill they were getting at the end. When I was ill with depression I did not have to worry about the cost of my prescriptions or my counselling. The times Phil has injured himself we have not had to worry about the bill from the Hospital for getting him checked out. Ben and I have not had to worry that while I've been off work I've been without coverage for my health (or traded electricity/food/rent for insurance coverage).

I think there's a lot to be said for that. So Happy Birthday NHS, here's to many many more.

ETA: Pretty much 1500 words. I wrote as much as that in some of my degree essays. Sorry guys!

ETA2 (2011): Since I wrote this my mum died from a rare form of Cancer. Her care was second to none and nothing was denied her on grounds of cost. We were not left with crippling bills, and not having to worry about finding money for her care made her last weeks and days easier for everyone.
lizziec: (bookshop)
I have a 4k word essay due tomorrow morning. I will be working all night and therefore spamming you horrendously with my progress.

Deal.

4:37am

FINISHED! :D


Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,859 / 4,000
(96.5%)


I'm now going to have a cornflake cake and catch some zzzzz's. Have to be at uni in 4.5 hours :|


4:34am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,844 / 4,000
(96.1%)


BWhahah!

4:26am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,699 / 4,000
(92.5%)


So close!

Hrm. Hungry. Perhaps I should have a crispy cake... :|

Decisions, decisions...

4:13am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,450 / 4,000
(86.3%)


OOh! I really am getting there! :D

3:56am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,086 / 4,000
(77.1%)


I think I might be getting there... :O

3:36am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,660 / 4,000
(66.5%)


Yay! Someone else is up! I thought I was the only one after [livejournal.com profile] kimble and [livejournal.com profile] barakta wimped out unusally "early" for them ;)

Yay for [livejournal.com profile] manyfacesofjase! :D He wins the prize ;)

3:17am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,220 / 4,000
(55.5%)


Powernap didn't help. Still exhausted. Doesn't help that Ben seems very restless tonight :|

2:20am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,928 / 4,000
(48.2%)


Keep falling asleep on my laptop. I also keep writing bollocks I have to go back and change after. I'm off for a power nap now I've reached practically half way. If I haven't spammed again in an hour call me :|

2:05am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,657 / 4,000
(41.4%)


1:46am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,212 / 4,000
(30.3%)


Oh fuck off. I must have done more than that :| :(

1:08am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
802 / 4,000
(20.1%)


12:30am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
358 / 4,000
(8.9%)


I still have a long way to go... :|

On the up side, I have now written my bibliography. Go me.
lizziec: (bookshop)
I have a 4k word essay due tomorrow morning. I will be working all night and therefore spamming you horrendously with my progress.

Deal.

4:37am

FINISHED! :D


Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,859 / 4,000
(96.5%)


I'm now going to have a cornflake cake and catch some zzzzz's. Have to be at uni in 4.5 hours :|


4:34am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,844 / 4,000
(96.1%)


BWhahah!

4:26am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,699 / 4,000
(92.5%)


So close!

Hrm. Hungry. Perhaps I should have a crispy cake... :|

Decisions, decisions...

4:13am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,450 / 4,000
(86.3%)


OOh! I really am getting there! :D

3:56am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,086 / 4,000
(77.1%)


I think I might be getting there... :O

3:36am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,660 / 4,000
(66.5%)


Yay! Someone else is up! I thought I was the only one after [livejournal.com profile] kimble and [livejournal.com profile] barakta wimped out unusally "early" for them ;)

Yay for [livejournal.com profile] manyfacesofjase! :D He wins the prize ;)

3:17am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,220 / 4,000
(55.5%)


Powernap didn't help. Still exhausted. Doesn't help that Ben seems very restless tonight :|

2:20am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,928 / 4,000
(48.2%)


Keep falling asleep on my laptop. I also keep writing bollocks I have to go back and change after. I'm off for a power nap now I've reached practically half way. If I haven't spammed again in an hour call me :|

2:05am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,657 / 4,000
(41.4%)


1:46am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,212 / 4,000
(30.3%)


Oh fuck off. I must have done more than that :| :(

1:08am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
802 / 4,000
(20.1%)


12:30am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
358 / 4,000
(8.9%)


I still have a long way to go... :|

On the up side, I have now written my bibliography. Go me.
lizziec: (bookshop)
I have a 4k word essay due tomorrow morning. I will be working all night and therefore spamming you horrendously with my progress.

Deal.

4:37am

FINISHED! :D


Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,859 / 4,000
(96.5%)


I'm now going to have a cornflake cake and catch some zzzzz's. Have to be at uni in 4.5 hours :|


4:34am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,844 / 4,000
(96.1%)


BWhahah!

4:26am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,699 / 4,000
(92.5%)


So close!

Hrm. Hungry. Perhaps I should have a crispy cake... :|

Decisions, decisions...

4:13am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,450 / 4,000
(86.3%)


OOh! I really am getting there! :D

3:56am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,086 / 4,000
(77.1%)


I think I might be getting there... :O

3:36am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,660 / 4,000
(66.5%)


Yay! Someone else is up! I thought I was the only one after [livejournal.com profile] kimble and [livejournal.com profile] barakta wimped out unusally "early" for them ;)

Yay for [livejournal.com profile] manyfacesofjase! :D He wins the prize ;)

3:17am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,220 / 4,000
(55.5%)


Powernap didn't help. Still exhausted. Doesn't help that Ben seems very restless tonight :|

2:20am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,928 / 4,000
(48.2%)


Keep falling asleep on my laptop. I also keep writing bollocks I have to go back and change after. I'm off for a power nap now I've reached practically half way. If I haven't spammed again in an hour call me :|

2:05am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,657 / 4,000
(41.4%)


1:46am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,212 / 4,000
(30.3%)


Oh fuck off. I must have done more than that :| :(

1:08am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
802 / 4,000
(20.1%)


12:30am
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
358 / 4,000
(8.9%)


I still have a long way to go... :|

On the up side, I have now written my bibliography. Go me.

Woo!

9 November 2005 04:03 am
lizziec: (XKCD sheeple)
Look how much essay I wrote tonight! :D

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,951 / 4,000
(98.0%)


*dances*

All done!

*hugs* to [livejournal.com profile] benc and [livejournal.com profile] evad_ukc who have kept me sane :D

Time for a couple of hours sleep then... ;)
lizziec: (XKCD well duh)
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,660 / 4,000
(40.0%)


Slowly approaching the half way point...

[edit] 23:28
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,788 / 4,000
(44.0%)


Just 6 more % before I can move onto the next section. Yay(!)

[edit] 23:38

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,949 / 4,000
(48.0%)


Almost there... (I think I can, I think I can...)

[edit] 00:11

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,203 / 4,000
(54.0%)


Feel incredibly restless right now :(

[edit] 01:43

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,528 / 4,000
(63.0%)


Keep falling asleep, ben keeps waking me up. No proper sleep for me tonight then I guess :(

[edit] 02:10
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,820 / 4,000
(70.0%)


I think ben wants to go to bed... :/

[edit] 02:33

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,128 / 4,000
(77.0%)


Ben's gone to bed :(

[edit] 03:04

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,409 / 4,000
(85.0%)


Into the final stretch now :D

Is it just me, or does this one in particular look like a penis?

[edit] 03:08

Thinking about it, they all look like penises :O

[edit] 03:30

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,763 / 4,000
(93.0%)


So close!

[edit] 03:42

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,951 / 4,000
(98.0%)


Woohoo! It's done :D

Just the bibliography to do now, then I can grab a couple of hours zzz :D
lizziec: (Default)
I don't wanna write WA1 so I am procrastinating.

Here is my mini me:


Your Birthdate: November 7

You are an island. You don't need anyone else to make you happy.
And though you see yourself as a loner, people are drawn to you.
Deep and sensitive, you tend to impress others with your insights.
You also tend to be psychic - so listen to that inner voice!

Your strength: Your self sufficiency

Your weakness: You despise authority

Your power color: Maroon

Your power symbol: Hammer

Your power month: July


and from [livejournal.com profile] synthclarion:
Do you think, in the course of your life so far, that you've changed anyone else's life? Have I changed your life in some way?

Comments screened - say if you don't want them unscreened.

WA1 - ho!
lizziec: (acid)
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,421 / 4,000
(35.0%)
lizziec: (animals - badgers)
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
1,044 / 4,000
(26.0%)


I may get some sleep after all tonight...
lizziec: (animals - bunny!)
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meterZokutou word meter
723 / 4,000
(17.0%)


...and with that, so to bedzzzzzzzzzzzz *sleeps*
lizziec: (animals - duckling-bum)
Thanks to everyone who wished me a happy birthday today :D

I would like to take this opportunity to introduce WA1, a 4k word essay due Wednesday - you will be seeing a lot more of this guy ;)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
271 / 4,000
(6.8%)


*yawns*

Looks like an all nighter for tomorrow then...
lizziec: (galaxies)
Essay 1 was:
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


Essay 2 was:
Zokutou word meter
5,264 / 5,000
(105.0%)


Essay 3, finished tonight in a push to finally finish it after crawling along for a week:
Zokutou word meter
2,696 / 2,500
(107.0%)


of which I did 1700 today ;)

Go me :P

[edit]
I just realised I finished the last essay that I have to do as an undergrad (barring exams). I just cried. I feel very emotional about it. How odd.

I don't want to leave and this brought me one step closer :'(
lizziec: (galaxies)
Essay 1 was:
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


Essay 2 was:
Zokutou word meter
5,264 / 5,000
(105.0%)


Essay 3, finished tonight in a push to finally finish it after crawling along for a week:
Zokutou word meter
2,696 / 2,500
(107.0%)


of which I did 1700 today ;)

Go me :P

[edit]
I just realised I finished the last essay that I have to do as an undergrad (barring exams). I just cried. I feel very emotional about it. How odd.

I don't want to leave and this brought me one step closer :'(
lizziec: (galaxies)
Essay 1 was:
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


Essay 2 was:
Zokutou word meter
5,264 / 5,000
(105.0%)


Essay 3, finished tonight in a push to finally finish it after crawling along for a week:
Zokutou word meter
2,696 / 2,500
(107.0%)


of which I did 1700 today ;)

Go me :P

[edit]
I just realised I finished the last essay that I have to do as an undergrad (barring exams). I just cried. I feel very emotional about it. How odd.

I don't want to leave and this brought me one step closer :'(

Geekery

15 April 2005 12:19 pm
lizziec: (Default)
I've updated my guide to screen and irssi and added a copy of my irssi config to my website.

A review of H2G2 (very uncomplimentary) can be found here. A longer one with spoilers in is here. Don't click on the wrong one and then blame me. :P

Mmmm - geekery :D

Zero progress on essays though :(
lizziec: (Default)
Essay 1
How important was Oh! What a Lovely War in confirming the myth of the Great War?

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


Found here in doc format and here in pdf.

Essay 2
In what ways and with what degree of success did the state promote new cultural policies during and immediately following the Second World War (1939-51)?

Zokutou word meter
5,264 / 5,000
(105.0%)


Found here in doc format and here in pdf.

Proof readers please *begs*

Two down, two to go (including scary 10000 word one)
lizziec: (Default)
Essay 1
How important was Oh! What a Lovely War in confirming the myth of the Great War?

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


Found here in doc format and here in pdf.

Essay 2
In what ways and with what degree of success did the state promote new cultural policies during and immediately following the Second World War (1939-51)?

Zokutou word meter
5,264 / 5,000
(105.0%)


Found here in doc format and here in pdf.

Proof readers please *begs*

Two down, two to go (including scary 10000 word one)
lizziec: (Default)
Essay 1
How important was Oh! What a Lovely War in confirming the myth of the Great War?

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


Found here in doc format and here in pdf.

Essay 2
In what ways and with what degree of success did the state promote new cultural policies during and immediately following the Second World War (1939-51)?

Zokutou word meter
5,264 / 5,000
(105.0%)


Found here in doc format and here in pdf.

Proof readers please *begs*

Two down, two to go (including scary 10000 word one)

Rargh!

10 April 2005 03:39 pm
lizziec: (Default)
Almost there!

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
4,800 / 5,000
(96.0%)

Rargh!

10 April 2005 03:39 pm
lizziec: (Default)
Almost there!

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
4,800 / 5,000
(96.0%)

Rargh!

10 April 2005 03:39 pm
lizziec: (Default)
Almost there!

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
4,800 / 5,000
(96.0%)
lizziec: (Default)
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,405 / 5,000
(48.0%)


In other news, ben has lost his mind, though watching him interrogate a cadbury's creme egg was mildly amusing.
lizziec: (Default)
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,405 / 5,000
(48.0%)


In other news, ben has lost his mind, though watching him interrogate a cadbury's creme egg was mildly amusing.
lizziec: (Default)
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,405 / 5,000
(48.0%)


In other news, ben has lost his mind, though watching him interrogate a cadbury's creme egg was mildly amusing.
lizziec: (Default)
Four essays which must have word counts that add up to 20500 words.

So far I have completed one essay:

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


I'm progressing with another:

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
958 / 5,000
(19.0%)


But it all looks pitiful when you put it into the word meter for the total :( :

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,876 / 20,500
(18.0%)
lizziec: (Default)
Four essays which must have word counts that add up to 20500 words.

So far I have completed one essay:

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


I'm progressing with another:

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
958 / 5,000
(19.0%)


But it all looks pitiful when you put it into the word meter for the total :( :

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,876 / 20,500
(18.0%)
lizziec: (Default)
Four essays which must have word counts that add up to 20500 words.

So far I have completed one essay:

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


I'm progressing with another:

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
958 / 5,000
(19.0%)


But it all looks pitiful when you put it into the word meter for the total :( :

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
3,876 / 20,500
(18.0%)
lizziec: (Default)
I have now finished one essay.

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


Oops - I'm over that word limit :S

I'd be greatful for proofreaders please:

How important was Oh! What a Lovely War in confirming the myth of the Great War? in document format
How important was Oh! What a Lovely War in confirming the myth of the Great War? in pdf format

One down, three to go... :S
lizziec: (Default)
I have now finished one essay.

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


Oops - I'm over that word limit :S

I'd be greatful for proofreaders please:

How important was Oh! What a Lovely War in confirming the myth of the Great War? in document format
How important was Oh! What a Lovely War in confirming the myth of the Great War? in pdf format

One down, three to go... :S
lizziec: (Default)
I have now finished one essay.

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
2,918 / 2,500
(116.0%)


Oops - I'm over that word limit :S

I'd be greatful for proofreaders please:

How important was Oh! What a Lovely War in confirming the myth of the Great War? in document format
How important was Oh! What a Lovely War in confirming the myth of the Great War? in pdf format

One down, three to go... :S
lizziec: (Default)
5 questions meme. You can comment, and I will give you 5 questions that you have to answer in you're own LJ. Questions courtesy of [livejournal.com profile] violetnights

1. Zip forwards 10 years time. Where do you see yourself? What will you be doing?
I see myself mother of one, pregnant with my second, a successful teacher, happily married (and still very much in love) and owner of my own home. *touches wood*

2. You've been given the incredible oppurtunity to rid the world of one evil (war, famine, sickness or whatever you think). What would you do and why?
I think I'd choose conflict - once people can work together then all other barriers can be overcome.

3. What's your favourite gemostone and why?
Sapphire - I love the beautiful dark blue a really good Sapphire gives off :)

4. Do you believe in ghosts? Had any supernatural experiences?
I don't believe in ghosts as such - I do believe in spirits, which in my opinion are different - you can sense them but they can do you no harm and you can't see them.

I also don't know that I'd call my experiences supernatural but I've felt many times as if someone is behind me when they aren't. I've also had a very real dream in which my father talked to me, but I'm still not sure what to make of either of those instances ;)

5. Which country would you most like to visit, if money were no object.
ooh - tough one! I think either China or Australia, with the US as a close third.

A Meme Stolen from [livejournal.com profile] lisaofdoom
A secret should be told to you by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with A, B, C, D
A compliment should be left by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with E, F, G, H
However, a complaint about you should be left by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with I, J, K, L
Some song lyrics should be posted for you to guess, by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with M, N, O, P
Also, a memory of you should be posted by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with Q, R, S, T
Ten words that bring you to mind should be posted by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with U, V, W, X
An "anonymous" comment should be left by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with Y, Z, numbers, or a _


Here's how far I am with my essay...
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
157 / 2,500
(6.0%)


...and a picture for you all!
lizziec: (Default)
5 questions meme. You can comment, and I will give you 5 questions that you have to answer in you're own LJ. Questions courtesy of [livejournal.com profile] violetnights

1. Zip forwards 10 years time. Where do you see yourself? What will you be doing?
I see myself mother of one, pregnant with my second, a successful teacher, happily married (and still very much in love) and owner of my own home. *touches wood*

2. You've been given the incredible oppurtunity to rid the world of one evil (war, famine, sickness or whatever you think). What would you do and why?
I think I'd choose conflict - once people can work together then all other barriers can be overcome.

3. What's your favourite gemostone and why?
Sapphire - I love the beautiful dark blue a really good Sapphire gives off :)

4. Do you believe in ghosts? Had any supernatural experiences?
I don't believe in ghosts as such - I do believe in spirits, which in my opinion are different - you can sense them but they can do you no harm and you can't see them.

I also don't know that I'd call my experiences supernatural but I've felt many times as if someone is behind me when they aren't. I've also had a very real dream in which my father talked to me, but I'm still not sure what to make of either of those instances ;)

5. Which country would you most like to visit, if money were no object.
ooh - tough one! I think either China or Australia, with the US as a close third.

A Meme Stolen from [livejournal.com profile] lisaofdoom
A secret should be told to you by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with A, B, C, D
A compliment should be left by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with E, F, G, H
However, a complaint about you should be left by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with I, J, K, L
Some song lyrics should be posted for you to guess, by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with M, N, O, P
Also, a memory of you should be posted by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with Q, R, S, T
Ten words that bring you to mind should be posted by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with U, V, W, X
An "anonymous" comment should be left by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with Y, Z, numbers, or a _


Here's how far I am with my essay...
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
157 / 2,500
(6.0%)


...and a picture for you all!
lizziec: (Default)
5 questions meme. You can comment, and I will give you 5 questions that you have to answer in you're own LJ. Questions courtesy of [livejournal.com profile] violetnights

1. Zip forwards 10 years time. Where do you see yourself? What will you be doing?
I see myself mother of one, pregnant with my second, a successful teacher, happily married (and still very much in love) and owner of my own home. *touches wood*

2. You've been given the incredible oppurtunity to rid the world of one evil (war, famine, sickness or whatever you think). What would you do and why?
I think I'd choose conflict - once people can work together then all other barriers can be overcome.

3. What's your favourite gemostone and why?
Sapphire - I love the beautiful dark blue a really good Sapphire gives off :)

4. Do you believe in ghosts? Had any supernatural experiences?
I don't believe in ghosts as such - I do believe in spirits, which in my opinion are different - you can sense them but they can do you no harm and you can't see them.

I also don't know that I'd call my experiences supernatural but I've felt many times as if someone is behind me when they aren't. I've also had a very real dream in which my father talked to me, but I'm still not sure what to make of either of those instances ;)

5. Which country would you most like to visit, if money were no object.
ooh - tough one! I think either China or Australia, with the US as a close third.

A Meme Stolen from [livejournal.com profile] lisaofdoom
A secret should be told to you by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with A, B, C, D
A compliment should be left by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with E, F, G, H
However, a complaint about you should be left by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with I, J, K, L
Some song lyrics should be posted for you to guess, by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with M, N, O, P
Also, a memory of you should be posted by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with Q, R, S, T
Ten words that bring you to mind should be posted by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with U, V, W, X
An "anonymous" comment should be left by: anyone with LJ usernames beginning with Y, Z, numbers, or a _


Here's how far I am with my essay...
Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
157 / 2,500
(6.0%)


...and a picture for you all!
lizziec: (Default)
I have now uploaded my pics of the moof curry meet/MoofCon reunion and the incredibly cute lambs that live in a field on the way to the childrens school. The lambs only went into the field last week so most of this week the children and I have been leaving home early for school just so we get time to look at them :))

CUTE! )

Didn't finish essay. Am stupid. Will finish it by close of play Monday...

Sunshine good. Off to Whitstable later :D
lizziec: (Default)
I have now uploaded my pics of the moof curry meet/MoofCon reunion and the incredibly cute lambs that live in a field on the way to the childrens school. The lambs only went into the field last week so most of this week the children and I have been leaving home early for school just so we get time to look at them :))

CUTE! )

Didn't finish essay. Am stupid. Will finish it by close of play Monday...

Sunshine good. Off to Whitstable later :D
lizziec: (Default)
I have now uploaded my pics of the moof curry meet/MoofCon reunion and the incredibly cute lambs that live in a field on the way to the childrens school. The lambs only went into the field last week so most of this week the children and I have been leaving home early for school just so we get time to look at them :))

CUTE! )

Didn't finish essay. Am stupid. Will finish it by close of play Monday...

Sunshine good. Off to Whitstable later :D
lizziec: (Default)
Today I wrote 800 words in 40 mins for seminar prep.

For my essay I have written 200 in an hour.

I'm stupid :( I just can't do it.

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
285 / 2,500
(11.0%)
lizziec: (Default)
Today I wrote 800 words in 40 mins for seminar prep.

For my essay I have written 200 in an hour.

I'm stupid :( I just can't do it.

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
285 / 2,500
(11.0%)
lizziec: (Default)
Today I wrote 800 words in 40 mins for seminar prep.

For my essay I have written 200 in an hour.

I'm stupid :( I just can't do it.

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
285 / 2,500
(11.0%)
lizziec: (Default)
Expect updates here. Updates will include the ever popular word meter :P

Today I had an uncanny experience. I was in the library and about to go up in the lift. There was already a girl waiting there with 5 law books and I mentioned it. She said to me "Oh - you're a third year aren't you?"

I looked a little puzzled and said "yeah - how did you know?"

She said "I lived in darwin my first year and I remember you always being on the computers. See, I was on them a lot too cos I was homesick and I thought people would see me there all the time and think I was strange. Then I'd see you and feel a bit better cos you were there as much as I was"

This comment made me smile and then become a bit worried really. I know I was on the computers in Darwin a lot in my first year but I didn't realuse I was known for it! ;)
lizziec: (Default)
Expect updates here. Updates will include the ever popular word meter :P

Today I had an uncanny experience. I was in the library and about to go up in the lift. There was already a girl waiting there with 5 law books and I mentioned it. She said to me "Oh - you're a third year aren't you?"

I looked a little puzzled and said "yeah - how did you know?"

She said "I lived in darwin my first year and I remember you always being on the computers. See, I was on them a lot too cos I was homesick and I thought people would see me there all the time and think I was strange. Then I'd see you and feel a bit better cos you were there as much as I was"

This comment made me smile and then become a bit worried really. I know I was on the computers in Darwin a lot in my first year but I didn't realuse I was known for it! ;)
lizziec: (Default)
Expect updates here. Updates will include the ever popular word meter :P

Today I had an uncanny experience. I was in the library and about to go up in the lift. There was already a girl waiting there with 5 law books and I mentioned it. She said to me "Oh - you're a third year aren't you?"

I looked a little puzzled and said "yeah - how did you know?"

She said "I lived in darwin my first year and I remember you always being on the computers. See, I was on them a lot too cos I was homesick and I thought people would see me there all the time and think I was strange. Then I'd see you and feel a bit better cos you were there as much as I was"

This comment made me smile and then become a bit worried really. I know I was on the computers in Darwin a lot in my first year but I didn't realuse I was known for it! ;)
lizziec: (Default)
Ah - yes... Compsoc :P

I am now officially society Secretary for the rest of this academic year. Meeting minutes from the sgm are here for the interested.

Been busy sorting things already. Am busy and happy :)

Handed essay in today. Have another overdue :( Hopefully get that done over the weekend :)

Belated valentines post - Ben made me cry by surprising me and also being very sweet.

Still ups and downs and the downs can still be very nasty, but the ups are definately dominant and much more up :)

Yay!
lizziec: (Default)
Ah - yes... Compsoc :P

I am now officially society Secretary for the rest of this academic year. Meeting minutes from the sgm are here for the interested.

Been busy sorting things already. Am busy and happy :)

Handed essay in today. Have another overdue :( Hopefully get that done over the weekend :)

Belated valentines post - Ben made me cry by surprising me and also being very sweet.

Still ups and downs and the downs can still be very nasty, but the ups are definately dominant and much more up :)

Yay!
lizziec: (Default)
Ah - yes... Compsoc :P

I am now officially society Secretary for the rest of this academic year. Meeting minutes from the sgm are here for the interested.

Been busy sorting things already. Am busy and happy :)

Handed essay in today. Have another overdue :( Hopefully get that done over the weekend :)

Belated valentines post - Ben made me cry by surprising me and also being very sweet.

Still ups and downs and the downs can still be very nasty, but the ups are definately dominant and much more up :)

Yay!
lizziec: (Default)
Essay is here.

I have
Zokutou word meter
5,081 / 5,000
(101.0%)

with footnotes (I have to count footnotes)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
4,580 / 5,000
(91.0%)

without footnotes (I'm so glad we count footnotes!)

and
Zokutou word meter
5,341 / 5,000
(106.0%)

if you count all the words there, including the bibliography.

I'm so happy I think I could cry :D

Now to start on tomorrow's semnar prep... o.O :(

Edit: It's ok, you can come out now. I've stopped playing with the word meter ;)



Until the next essay, that is ;) Ph33r!
lizziec: (Default)
Essay is here.

I have
Zokutou word meter
5,081 / 5,000
(101.0%)

with footnotes (I have to count footnotes)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
4,580 / 5,000
(91.0%)

without footnotes (I'm so glad we count footnotes!)

and
Zokutou word meter
5,341 / 5,000
(106.0%)

if you count all the words there, including the bibliography.

I'm so happy I think I could cry :D

Now to start on tomorrow's semnar prep... o.O :(

Edit: It's ok, you can come out now. I've stopped playing with the word meter ;)



Until the next essay, that is ;) Ph33r!
lizziec: (Default)
Essay is here.

I have
Zokutou word meter
5,081 / 5,000
(101.0%)

with footnotes (I have to count footnotes)

Zokutou word meterZokutou word meter
4,580 / 5,000
(91.0%)

without footnotes (I'm so glad we count footnotes!)

and
Zokutou word meter
5,341 / 5,000
(106.0%)

if you count all the words there, including the bibliography.

I'm so happy I think I could cry :D

Now to start on tomorrow's semnar prep... o.O :(

Edit: It's ok, you can come out now. I've stopped playing with the word meter ;)



Until the next essay, that is ;) Ph33r!

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